RecyclingOT's Videos

Bagel Picture Ring Stacks are Fun 1m32s

Bagel Picture Ring Stacks are Fun

It occurred to me that pictures of bagels and donuts would be fun and meaningful to use on a ring stack. I printed the pictures, laminated them and cut out the center holes. I made the ring stack by wedging a groan stick toy inside the bottle opening and securing it in place. It makes a fun sound when turned over. My clients really enjoyed identifying the types of bagels, as well as stacking them. Make the center holes larger to make easier and smaller to create challenge. Notice how the lady in the video needs to use both hands together in order to push the bagel down. Learn more about activity adaptations at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Functional Hand  Activity:  An Alternative to  Clasping Hands 1m18s

Functional Hand Activity: An Alternative to Clasping Hands

My sweet client likes to soothe herself by putting her fingers in her mouth and clasping her hands tightly. You can see that she is wearing a chewable necklace and she sometimes will keep that in her mouth. This video demonstrates a brief activity alternative. I put several rings made out of socks on each arm. She really liked that tight feeling. After she removed each ring I put them on my arms and repeated the game. Then the rings went to the laundry basket! If you are a parent or work with children or adults with developmental disabilities give it a try. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Sensory-Motor  Activities for  Individuals with  Autism 2m04s

Sensory-Motor Activities for Individuals with Autism

Children and adults on the autism spectrum often benefit from sensory stimulation that promotes calm, focus, engagement and decreases agitation. Walking and moving up and down stimulates the vestibular (balance) system. Wearing a weighted or pressure vest and moving weighted objects stimulates the proprioceptive sensory receptors in muscles and joints. These types of sensory-motor activities help children to develop coordination and body awareness. Parents and teachers may set up play and learning centers incorporating these types of sensory stimulation. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Occupational Therapy Cone Activities 2m05s

Occupational Therapy Cone Activities

Occupational therapists love using cones to develop bilateral grasp, reaching skills and eye-hand coordination. Clients develop postural control and balance as they reach for cones while in a variety of positions such as kneeling or standing on top of a dynamic surface (such as a horse!). Clients with poor attention may be motivated to engage in hand activities such as the vibrating cone stacker. Try placing the cones on the floor and the vibrating cone stack on a high surface across the room to incorporate lots of movement into this sensory activity. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Recycling Art at Memorial ACTe, museum of slavery in Guadeloupe 1m23s

Recycling Art at Memorial ACTe, museum of slavery in Guadeloupe

While vacationing in the beautiful country of Guadeloupe, I came across plastic bottles and other recycled objects used in art. These pictures were taken at the Memorial ACTe, museum of slavery. I think that the sardine cans might symbolize a slave ship and the connected plastic bottles look to me like chains. The museum was incredible and multi-sensory with sound effects, music, art and videos. Check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5vtgj0mWTU and learn more about using recycling materials in therapy at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Strengthening the  Tripod Grasp  Fingers 1m40s

Strengthening the Tripod Grasp Fingers

A "tripod" pencil grasp is considered most efficient during handwriting. The term “tripod” is used because 3 fingers- the index, middle fingers and thumb look like a tripod when controlling the pencil. Young children strengthen and develop coordination between the “tripod fingers” when squeezing clothespins, chip clips or tongs. This video demonstrates how to make and use similar "tongs" in repetitive fine-motor activities that young children or adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Velcro Bottles for  Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 2m03s

Velcro Bottles for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

I have been using what I call "Velcro bottles" for over 30 years! They are easy to make and all you need is a bottle, sticky back Velcro and shapes, pictures or objects to attach. Screw the lid back onto large bottles to prevent losing small pieces. Removing the items to insert develops skills to use hands together, visual attention, eye-hand coordination and hand strength. Children with and without disabilities may begin developing hand skills playing with Velcro Bottles as soon as they can safely avoid putting small objects in the mouth. Adults with developmental disabilities will also benefit from this simple, repetitive fine- motor task that can be completed in a short amount of time. This makes it perfect for people with short attention spans! Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Bilateral Ring Stack  for Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m46s

Bilateral Ring Stack for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

I created this bilateral ring stack many years ago to encourage children and adults with developmental disabilities to use both hands during fine motor activities. This is made by wedging two dowels inside a box or other container; secure in place with duct tape. This ring stack is more than a simple repetitive task. It provides the following sensory stimulation which may motivate engagement because it is fun! 1)There are pictures to look at and possibly identify (visual stimulation) 2)A dog toy is attached to the container. It squeaks when the shapes are pressed down hard enough (auditory stimulation) 3) Force is required to push these shapes down and activate the squeaky toy (proprioceptive stimulation). 4) You may be able to wedge a motorized toothbrush inside one or both dowels (more proprioceptive stimulation). 5) Clients may stand or walk around to retrieve materials. If you place a box of shapes on the floor and the stack on the table, they will be moving up and down (vestibular stimulation). Learn more about occupational therapy adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Visual Stimulation  Ring Stack for  Individuals with  Autism 1m10s

Visual Stimulation Ring Stack for Individuals with Autism

This activity is very easy to make and fun for typically developing children as well as children and adults with autism or other developmental disorders that impact attention and hand skills. Individuals need to use both hands to position the rings with notches cut in the center on top of the “spiral sensory ring stack”. Then they let go and enjoy the visual stimulation of the shape spiraling down. I bought the helicopter toy at the Dollar store. The spiral piece is wedged and taped inside a bottle opening. I cut the colorful plastic rings out of detergent and dishwasher soap bottles and cut notches in the center. This activity promotes visual attention, eye-hand coordination and using hands together. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Stretchy Cord Ring  Stack for Individuals  with Developmental  Disabilities 2m09s

Stretchy Cord Ring Stack for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Children or adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy the sensory stimulation they experience while pulling shapes attached to stretchy cord. They need to stabilize the board with one hand while pulling the shape so that they can place it over the "ring stack" in the center of the board. Pulling stimulates muscles and joints and strengthens hands. Additional tactile stimulation was provided when I covered the board with fur and attached an electric tooth brush to the center. I made the plastic shapes by cutting up plastic containers. Punch holes in them to attach to the cord. The wooden circle shown in the video happened to be available at work, but you can make a similar board by cutting up the lid to a large storage container. Learn more about activity adaptations at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Partner Activity for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities 1m50s

Partner Activity for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Many of my clients enjoy pushing golf balls into a small opening in a bucket lid. This takes force and provides sensory stimulation. I built onto that activity so that they work with a partner as one person inserts balls into the tube and the other person retrieves it and then pushes it into the hole. The individuals in the video range from young adult to elderly and non-ambulatory to very active. This activity promotes bilateral hand skills, sequencing and social skills. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Make-Your-Own Lacing Cord Activities 2m23s

Make-Your-Own Lacing Cord Activities

Save your shampoo, vinegar or bleach bottles to cut in a spiral fashion to make lacing cord. I cut all types of shapes, such as hearts, Easter eggs or fish and make notches in them for lacing. This is a great activity to develop eye-hand coordination with very young children with or without disabilities and older individuals with fine-motor challenges. The young adult in the video loves this type of repetitive activity and has a picture of it in his daily visual schedule. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Adapting  Insertion Task  for Patient  with Spastic  Hands 2m06s

Adapting Insertion Task for Patient with Spastic Hands

My client is a very sweet woman who suffered a traumatic brain injury and has limited hand function. She told me that she likes this activity because it develops her "eye-hand coordination". I adapted a magnetic wand by wrapping it in soft fabric so that it is comfortable while at the same time opening up her hand. The active movement and grasping shown in the video appears to decrease pain, stiffness and enables her to engage in functional movements. This adaptation may be helpful for patients with spasticity due to cerebral palsy or other conditions. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Simple Weaving Shapes for Children with Autism 2m13s

Simple Weaving Shapes for Children with Autism

Here is an easy to make activity that develops eye-hand coordination. Young children and older individuals with developmental disabilities such as autism may enjoy the repetitive nature of weaving the shapes together or taking them apart. This fun activity strengthens hands and helps to develop the motor control required to cut with scissors and write. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Sensory Frisbee Ring Stack 3m07s

Sensory Frisbee Ring Stack

It takes force to push these rings down the sturdy tube used as a ring stack. I had a surplus of Frisbees at work and cut out the centers to make the rings (using heavy duty leather shears). My clients with developmental disabilities including some on the autism spectrum love this adapted ring stack. They receive sensory feedback from muscles and joints as they either push the rings down or pull them off. They are encouraged to use both hands in order to be successful. This activity can be performed from a wheelchair or while standing. It can be a solitary activity or performed with a social partner. Reaching to eye level strengthens the arms, promotes visual attention and an upright posture since they are not hunched over looking downward. Learn more about activity adaptations at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Bottle Coloring and Erasing to Develop Pencil Control 1m48s

Bottle Coloring and Erasing to Develop Pencil Control

Coloring and erasing with a dry erase marker is fun! The little girl in the video is developing dexterity to control a pencil, marker or other writing tool as she flips it over to erase and back to color more. This is an easy and quick activity to cut out of a large bottle. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Pill Bottle Sensory Activity 2m13s

Pill Bottle Sensory Activity

Save those pill bottles! Put marbles, beads, pennies or other cool sounding objects inside. Secure the covers with duct tape. My clients enjoy pulling the bottles out of the openings inside a desk file organizer. They are a perfect fit since it requires force to push them in or pull them out. Using force stimulates the brain- helping people with developmental disabilities to engage while developing hand skills. This activity develops strong hands and coordination. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Fan and Switch Make Fine-Motor Activities- FUN! 1m47s

Fan and Switch Make Fine-Motor Activities- FUN!

My client loves the fan! He is nonverbal, developmentally delayed and has cerebral palsy. I noticed that he has a picture of a fan on his communication board but since it was not summer, there wasn't a fan in the room. I set-up a large button switch that activates a small (safe) fan so that he can turn it on anytime he chooses. He is also able to point to the "fan" picture on his communication board to indicate that he wants the fan and switch set up. Enabling the client to communication what they want and be in control of sensory stimulation such as a fan or music may decrease agitation and increase happiness! Learn more about activity adaptations at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Make-your-own Valentine Hearts and Arrows 2m25s

Make-your-own Valentine Hearts and Arrows

This video demonstrates how to cut plastic containers to make one or several sets of Valentine hearts and arrows. Children and adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy celebrating the holiday with this activity. They may 1) put them together or 2) take them apart and then 3) insert the pieces into a container Explore how to use these with your children or clients as they develop fine-motor control and strong fingers. More activity ideas at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Love Trumps Hate 1m12s

Love Trumps Hate

Sharing a little Etch-A-Sketch fun and showing off my fine-motor control! http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Form Board Picture Activity for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities 2m11s

Form Board Picture Activity for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Form boards are designed for young children to learn how to fit shapes into corresponding openings. My older clients with developmental disabilities are also working on these skills. However, this form board is made with meaningful, age-appropriate pictures that I printed and laminated. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Make Zoom Ball for Individuals with Autism 3m57s

Make Zoom Ball for Individuals with Autism

Zoom Ball (also called "Forward Pass") is a great activity for all children and especially helpful for those with visual attention and/or motor coordination challenges. How to play: 1)Each player holds a handle in each hand 2)One player keeps hands close together while the other player moves arms apart. 3)The "ball" flies across to the other player 4) Reverse and repeat over and over again This activity strengthens shoulders, arms and hands. It develops coordination between the right and left sides of the body and rhythm as the ball moves back and forth. Visual attention and tracking skills may improve as children or adults watch the "ball" move quickly back and forth. My clients on the autism spectrum and those with other developmental disabilities have really enjoyed playing this partner game...... Tip: the shorter the cord, the easier to play.... Learn more about activity adaptations at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Simple Social Ball Game 1m20s

Simple Social Ball Game

Children and adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy this simple ball game. I filled up a long sock with sensory type objects like bells, marbles, foam, etc. and tied the ends to handles. The handles you see in the video were cut from large bottles but you can create any type of handle you choose as long as it is easy and comfortable to grasp. Players are learning to follow my directions. Perhaps after they learn the steps to this routine another client can position the balls on the table. That will take teamwork! This activity works on developing motor planning skills, visual attention and social skills. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com