RecyclingOT's Videos

Adapting Velcro Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders 1m49s

Adapting Velcro Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders

Ripping Velcro off backings is a great sensory activity because pulling stimulates the muscles, tendons and joints and at the same time provides auditory feedback with the ripping sound. The Loop Velcro covered board shown in the video can be positioned to promote reaching, trunk rotation and visual attention since the materials on the wall are easier to see than if on the table. If children or adults with developmental disabilities have difficulty learning how to attach loop and hook sides together, simply apply bright nail polish to the non-velcro side that you want facing up. Ripping longer or stronger pieces of Velcro from backings requires using both hands together-helping individuals with sensory processing disorders to develop bilateral hand skills, visual engagement and sequencing skills. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Matching Numbers Screw Cap Activity to Develop Fine- Motor Skills 2m54s

Matching Numbers Screw Cap Activity to Develop Fine- Motor Skills

Children or adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy matching as they screw bottle caps onto the corresponding size threaded pieces. Write numbers, letters or glue pictures to caps and threaded pieces to make matching fun! Materials needed: 1)Threaded pieces cut from plastic bottles 2) Caps or covers that screw onto the threaded pieces 3)A long strip of fabric 4) A container to insert the lids into (optional) Cut 2 holes in each threaded piece in order to string them onto the cord. You will see in the video that some clients preferred to sit. However, I adapted the materials to encourage reaching or standing. Some clients not only enjoy standing, they crave movement and this activity enables them to retrieve materials located on the floor or across the room. Screwing or unscrewing the lids strengthens hands and develops bilateral hand coordination. Making this activity costs virtually ZERO $$$$ Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Pop Tube Activity for Individuals with  Autism 1m32s

Sensory Pop Tube Activity for Individuals with Autism

A large detergent bottle has a "Sensory Pop Tube" attached to one opening to push/pull rings down. Use shower rings or cut plastic bottles into donut shapes. These are not only free, but also vibrant and won’t break easily. Curly strips are inserted into the other opening. This video demonstrates how to make them: Https://rumble.com/v6l3fv-curly-insertions-develop-motor-planning-skills.html Cut a secret opening on the bottom of the bottle to remove the curly strips. This activity develops the visual perceptual skills to choose whether the plastic pieces either need to be pushed down the tube or inserted into the opening. While developing eye hand coordination, the child or adult with autism or other types of developmental delays will enjoy using force on these materials and the sound of the rings going down the pop tube. Using force stimulates the muscles, joints and tendons helping individuals with sensory processing disorders develop body awareness and motor coordination. Increase the motor planning challenge by twisting the pop tube to bend in different directions! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Baby Tray Sensory  Activity for  Children with  Autism 1m50s

Baby Tray Sensory Activity for Children with Autism

Children and adults with autism or other types of developmental disabilities often benefit from pulling sensory activities that stimulate the muscles, joints and tendons. The video demonstrates pulling colorful shapes off of curly plastic strips attached to a tray. I drilled holes in the tray (actually a wonderful maintenance man at work did) to push the strips through and attach on the bottom of the tray. The following video demonstrates how to make the curly strips by cutting around bottles: https://rumble.com/v6l3fv-curly-insertions-develop-motor-planning-skills.html The last step is to cut a notch in the shapes for stringing or removing. Some children will be able to string while matching by color, shape or objects (in this case, apples, bananas and grapes). Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Walking and Sensory Stimulation! 59s

Walking and Sensory Stimulation!

Walking is great exercise that also provides vestibular sensory stimulation that impacts balance and body awareness. Many of my clients are sedentary, obese and/or have limited physical endurance. The program hallways are designed for walking groups. However, there is not always enough staff to provide supervision and many clients refuse to participate. Therefore, I find it helpful to create simple movement activities that involve walking across the room and/or moving materials at different heights. Staff can gradually increase endurance, by providing more materials to transfer. Although functional activities such as putting away groceries or recreational pastimes such as walking in a park are ideal forms of exercise, clients who enjoy repetitive tasks in the program or classroom, benefit when activities are adapted to involve walking. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Window Rings: for  Reaching,  Crossing  midline and Trunk  Rotation 2m02s

Window Rings: for Reaching, Crossing midline and Trunk Rotation

These "rings" are cut from round containers and are open-ended so that they can be attached to or pulled off suspended cord or a tube. Many of my clients are sedentary and this is a great way to encourage standing, reaching, crossing midline, trunk rotation and if possible walking from one part of the room to another to retrieve more materials. Notice that I used a lot of verbal cues with one client and nonverbal cues with the other. We all learn and follow directions in different ways! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Activities  Using Magnetic  White Board 1m48s

Sensory Activities Using Magnetic White Board

Using vertical surfaces has always been a popular occupational therapy strategy used in school systems and pediatric clinics. I work with adults with developmental disabilities who continue to benefit from vertical plane activities. I notice that in many of the program rooms these fantastic therapeutic materials (AKA white boards) are filled with schedules, photographs and organized to be attractive as well as functional. However I believe that whiteboards can be functional, therapeutic and as well as beautiful! This video demonstrates just one of many simple therapeutic activities that uses 3 common materials: Magnetic white boards, dry erase markers and magnets. Benefits of this activity for young children and/or adults with developmental disabilities include: 1) Visual attention is easier when materials are right in front of the face 2) Standing, reaching high/low and moving back and forth between magnet container and white board is more aerobic than sitting and movement provides sensory stimulation. Unfortunately, many of my clients who are obese and sedentary may find this activity an endurance challenge. 3)Students or clients developing social skills as they work together to perform one of the 3 main steps (i.e. drawing circles, placing or removing magnets and cleaning the board) 4) Learning to clean the board helps them to improve similar motor and daily living skills such as wiping tables or drying trays. 5)This activity encourages using both side of the body at the same time. My client in the wheelchair who had a brain injury avoids using hands together and crossing midline. This activity was fun and fairly simple so he was willing to use one hand to control the wheelchair and the other hand to do the task. 6) This activity can be easily adapted to work on cognitive skills such as color matching, picture identification or counting. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Curly Insertions  Develop Motor  Planning Skills 1m31s

Curly Insertions Develop Motor Planning Skills

These "curly insertion strips" are cut out of round containers. They add a little pizzazz and challenge to ordinary insertion tasks as children or adults with developmental disabilities manipulate them. This activity promotes 1) using two hands together 2) visual attention when materials are raised to eye level 3)sequencing skills when the strips are pulled off a cord and then inserted 4) sensory stimulation when pulling or pushing to remove or insert the strips Adapt the activity according to the person's needs. Insertion openings may be larger or smaller than the ones shown here. The curly strips may be longer or shorter. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Fabric Ring Stack for  Children with Sensory  Processing Disorders 1m15s

Fabric Ring Stack for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

Children or adults with sensory processing disorders might enjoy pushing pieces of fabric on or pulling them off a simple homemade stack. Simply wedge a sturdy tube inside a detergent bottle. Secure with duct tape. The bottle handle provides an enlarged, comfortable grasping handle that encourages them to stabilize materials. Individuals with autism and others with sensory processing disorders benefit from the force used to pull or push the fabric on or off the tube. Use varied fabric textures to develop tactile discrimination skills. It is often easier for children with attention challenges to visually engage on what they are doing when the materials are straight in front of their eyes. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sticker adaptation  to squeeze  Clothespins 1m16s

Sticker adaptation to squeeze Clothespins

Attaching colorful stickers to indicate which end of the clothespin to squeeze is a simple and effective adaptation. Squeezing clothespins strengthens fingers and helps young children develop a tripod pencil grasp. My sedentary clients benefit as they move around the room or reach high and low to retrieve or return the clothespins. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Picture Insertion  Activity to  Promote Bilateral  Hand use 1m34s

Picture Insertion Activity to Promote Bilateral Hand use

This activity develops bilateral hand skills as individuals insert a picture attached with string and beads through a container opening. This is really difficult to do when using only one hand as many of my clients attempt! This activity also develops visual perceptual skills to rotate and position objects to fit through the opening. I used laminated pictures of meaningful objects to work on picture identification and language. Another option is to cut shapes out of readily available plastic containers. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Table for  Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m20s

Sensory Table for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

This "sensory table" enables me to provide a fun, safe area for clients to pull, push, squeeze, roll and even pedal an arm cycle. The materials are strapped onto the table and nothing reaches as far as their mouths- removing choking risks. The idea came when I observed these individuals reaching over to grab materials other clients were using for insertions, puzzles or ring stacks. Some materials on this "sensory table" make sounds or vibrate. It’s a work in progress as I add new items that my clients may enjoy or remove items they grow bored with.... Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Teamwork to  Perform  "Clothespin"  Insertion Activity 1m46s

Teamwork to Perform "Clothespin" Insertion Activity

One of my clients is blind, likes to sing and has pretty good coordination. The other has cerebral palsy, uses a communication book and loves to help. They are the best of friends as you will see in this video as they work together to remove the plastic "clothespins" from the cord I tied around the table. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Blind-Deaf Client  performing Reach and  Insert Activity 1m21s

Blind-Deaf Client performing Reach and Insert Activity

This sweet man is blind-deaf and cognitively impaired, but he enjoys insertion tasks, especially novel ones. He has been inserting objects into container openings for many years and he seemed to enjoy a new challenge--- reaching to remove the "clothespins" I made by cutting up plastic containers. This activity works on: 1) exploring his environment 2) reaching with both hands 3) using one hand to stabilize the container while using the other hand to insert objects. Notice that I attached golf balls with Velcro to the top of the table to insert into the containers round hole. The bucket functions as a 2 hole shape- sorter. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Hoola Hoop Motor Planning Game 1m37s

Hoola Hoop Motor Planning Game

My clients really enjoyed this hoop activity! It requires 2 hoops and 3 or more players. The player in orange picks up the empty hoop and places it over the first individual. Then this first individual steps out of the hoop and the 2nd player steps into the newly emptied hoop. This sequence can continue indefinitely. Some children or adults may be able to play this with 2 teams and compete to see who can reach an end point first.... I love this activity because it works on • balance as the individuals step in and out of hoops • motor planning as the hoop is placed over a player’s head • following directions and • patience to wait for the other players to complete their part…. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

High-Low- Reaching Activity for Individuals with Autism 1m55s

High-Low- Reaching Activity for Individuals with Autism

Make-Your-Own clothespins for an unlimited supply of bright, vibrant, any size clothespins to clip onto a line. Here is the video that demonstrates how… https://rumble.com/v690er-diy-clothespins-activity-to-build-fine-motor-skills.html I love this activity because my clients get exercise and sensory stimulation when moving high and low or across the room to retrieve materials. They are also working on visual attention, manipulation skills and sequencing. Color sorting is optional. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

DIY: Clothespins  Activity to Build  Fine-Motor Skills 1m23s

DIY: Clothespins Activity to Build Fine-Motor Skills

Do-It-Yourself clothespins can be used in many different activities with children or adults with or without disabilities. Your children will love watching you recycle plastic containers to make their toys! The video shows the metal CD stand I found at a yard sale. It seemed perfect for attaching either purchased or home-made clothespins. Some individuals love color matching and others may prefer simply removing them. The individual in the video has a lot of energy so I scattered the plastic pins on the floor for him to gather up before attaching. The metal stand is removed when he is finished to avoid accidentally throwing it. Option: Try tying cord across the room to attach the “clothespins”. Reaching to attach or remove them is great exercise for elderly individuals or anyone who benefits from reaching activities. Residents in nursing homes may enjoy this, too! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Velcro Fine-Motor Task  for Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m27s

Velcro Fine-Motor Task for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Ripping Velcro off backings is fun for children and adults! Pulling provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints and many people enjoy the ripping sound. The client in the video is blind , so the auditory and proprioceptive input helps him focus as he sequences the steps of 1) ripping the shapes off the board and 2) inserting them into the container. Students or clients with vision might enjoy identifying pictures before ripping them off the board. Some may be able to identify the shapes. It has been challenging to find a repetitive task that this individual can perform independently, I think I found a winner….. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Deep Pressure Sensory  Processing  Activity: Pulling Rings off Cord Inside Sock 1m46s

Deep Pressure Sensory Processing Activity: Pulling Rings off Cord Inside Sock

Pulling objects out of a tight sock provides deep pressure sensory stimulation to skin, muscles and joints. This activity adaptation adds the complexity of pulling the rings off of the cord that is attached inside the long sock. This client is visually impaired and frequently seeks sensory stimulation by shaking her head. I think that she enjoys this type of repetitive sensory-based activity that offers a greater challenge that simply inserting objects into an opening. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Stringing Sensory  Shapes  for Individuals  with Autism 1m15s

Stringing Sensory Shapes for Individuals with Autism

This activity combines stringing with fitting shapes into a container opening. Use thicker cord or make the lid opening smaller to increase the amount of force required. Using force to pull and push provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints. Many children or adults with sensory processing disorders and/or autism may be motivated to engage in this type of sensory-based adaptation. Explore inserting a motorized toothbrush into the container for addition stimulation! The client shown in this video typically avoids using his hands together but loves simple insertion tasks. The combination of stringing and insertion is very motivating for him. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make A  Sensory Activity  out of a Phone  Charger Coil 2m04s

How to Make A Sensory Activity out of a Phone Charger Coil

Recycle those broken phone chargers or buy a cheap one from a Dollar Store to make this great sensory stimulation fine-motor activity. Suitable for young children with or without disabilities or adults who enjoy repetitive hand tasks; this activity develops skills to: 1) Use hands together 2) Eye-Hand coordination 3) Manipulate screw covers 4) Color matching In addition, this activity helps children discover which hand they prefer using. Notice which hand seems stronger or better coordinated while grasping the handle with one hand and pulling with the other and then reversing hands used. Ask your child or student which feels better. Pulling the shapes on or off the coils requires force and force builds strength while stimulating the muscles and joints. Many of my clients find this calming. Give it a try! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Looping Craft: Team Work 1m08s

Looping Craft: Team Work

Both of these adults with developmental disabilities have behavioral challenges and love to earn token rewards at their day program. They can easily become frustrated and agitated but were highly motivated to work together to sequence adding loops to a long chain. I provided verbal directions and actually started to sing them and after about 10 minutes they were able to work with only supervision. One client has the motor planning skills to form and sequence the loops and the other client has he skills to pull the long strand -keeping the materials taut and untangled. I love team work! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make  "Spring Rings" for  Fine-Motor  Activities 1m50s

How to Make "Spring Rings" for Fine-Motor Activities

Children and adults with autism and/or other types of developmental disabilities will be motivated to pull these home-made “spring rings” as they stretch them over a ring stack or pull them off objects (i.e. ring stacks or suspended cord) to insert into container openings. Pulling on these springy spirals is fun to watch and stimulates the skin, joints and muscles in the process. Manipulating these rings promotes using hands together and motor planning skills. Children with or without disabilities will enjoy all this sensory stimulation and children who avoid touching objects may find them irresistible! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Simple Pull Activity  for Sensory Processing  Disorders 2m30s

Simple Pull Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders

Individuals with sensory processing disorders (SPD) often have decreased hand strength, avoid using their hands together and have poor coordination. This describes many children and adults on the autism spectrum or who have another type of disability. This simple activity encourages using hands together because it is really difficult to perform with one hand! Many people with SPD avoid touching different types of materials but don’t mind plastic. It takes a lot of force to pull these plastic rings off the cord and pulling with force stimulates muscles and joints while strengthening muscles. Adapt for your child or individual: 1) Use rings with larger or smaller holes in the center depending so that they are successful. You can always use rings with smaller holes later as they get stronger. 2) Some of my clients prefer to stand and pace while performing this (See in the video how I tied the cord around my waist while the client pulled the rings off). Other clients prefer sitting at a table or in a chair away from the table. 3) Pulling the rings off takes less motor planning skill and coordination than stringing them on. But some children or clients may be able to or prefer to string. 4) Ring shapes are easier to grasp and manipulate than beads and they don’t roll away. But you may certainly progress onto using large and then smaller beads. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Adapted Ring  Stack for  Individual with  Hemiplegia 1m56s

Adapted Ring Stack for Individual with Hemiplegia

My client is using a ring stack I adapted just for him! I wedged a tube inside the container lid. Next, I attached a dowel for his left hand to grasp so that he is involved in stabilizing the materials. His left hand is spastic and typically fisted, so this is a great way to relax it while he uses his right hand to reach, grasp, position and release the ring shapes. I simply sliced up cylindrical containers or cut holes in lids to make "rings". I can't show his smiling face, but he really enjoys being able to do a hand activity and some days can do it independently! The strap I used to help him keep his left hand on the dowel is sold by https://eazyhold.com/ Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com