RecyclingOT's Videos

Velcro Fine-Motor Task  for Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m27s

Velcro Fine-Motor Task for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Ripping Velcro off backings is fun for children and adults! Pulling provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints and many people enjoy the ripping sound. The client in the video is blind , so the auditory and proprioceptive input helps him focus as he sequences the steps of 1) ripping the shapes off the board and 2) inserting them into the container. Students or clients with vision might enjoy identifying pictures before ripping them off the board. Some may be able to identify the shapes. It has been challenging to find a repetitive task that this individual can perform independently, I think I found a winner….. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Deep Pressure Sensory  Processing  Activity: Pulling Rings off Cord Inside Sock 1m46s

Deep Pressure Sensory Processing Activity: Pulling Rings off Cord Inside Sock

Pulling objects out of a tight sock provides deep pressure sensory stimulation to skin, muscles and joints. This activity adaptation adds the complexity of pulling the rings off of the cord that is attached inside the long sock. This client is visually impaired and frequently seeks sensory stimulation by shaking her head. I think that she enjoys this type of repetitive sensory-based activity that offers a greater challenge that simply inserting objects into an opening. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Stringing Sensory  Shapes  for Individuals  with Autism 1m15s

Stringing Sensory Shapes for Individuals with Autism

This activity combines stringing with fitting shapes into a container opening. Use thicker cord or make the lid opening smaller to increase the amount of force required. Using force to pull and push provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints. Many children or adults with sensory processing disorders and/or autism may be motivated to engage in this type of sensory-based adaptation. Explore inserting a motorized toothbrush into the container for addition stimulation! The client shown in this video typically avoids using his hands together but loves simple insertion tasks. The combination of stringing and insertion is very motivating for him. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make A  Sensory Activity  out of a Phone  Charger Coil 2m04s

How to Make A Sensory Activity out of a Phone Charger Coil

Recycle those broken phone chargers or buy a cheap one from a Dollar Store to make this great sensory stimulation fine-motor activity. Suitable for young children with or without disabilities or adults who enjoy repetitive hand tasks; this activity develops skills to: 1) Use hands together 2) Eye-Hand coordination 3) Manipulate screw covers 4) Color matching In addition, this activity helps children discover which hand they prefer using. Notice which hand seems stronger or better coordinated while grasping the handle with one hand and pulling with the other and then reversing hands used. Ask your child or student which feels better. Pulling the shapes on or off the coils requires force and force builds strength while stimulating the muscles and joints. Many of my clients find this calming. Give it a try! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Looping Craft: Team Work 1m08s

Looping Craft: Team Work

Both of these adults with developmental disabilities have behavioral challenges and love to earn token rewards at their day program. They can easily become frustrated and agitated but were highly motivated to work together to sequence adding loops to a long chain. I provided verbal directions and actually started to sing them and after about 10 minutes they were able to work with only supervision. One client has the motor planning skills to form and sequence the loops and the other client has he skills to pull the long strand -keeping the materials taut and untangled. I love team work! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make  "Spring Rings" for  Fine-Motor  Activities 1m50s

How to Make "Spring Rings" for Fine-Motor Activities

Children and adults with autism and/or other types of developmental disabilities will be motivated to pull these home-made “spring rings” as they stretch them over a ring stack or pull them off objects (i.e. ring stacks or suspended cord) to insert into container openings. Pulling on these springy spirals is fun to watch and stimulates the skin, joints and muscles in the process. Manipulating these rings promotes using hands together and motor planning skills. Children with or without disabilities will enjoy all this sensory stimulation and children who avoid touching objects may find them irresistible! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Simple Pull Activity  for Sensory Processing  Disorders 2m30s

Simple Pull Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders

Individuals with sensory processing disorders (SPD) often have decreased hand strength, avoid using their hands together and have poor coordination. This describes many children and adults on the autism spectrum or who have another type of disability. This simple activity encourages using hands together because it is really difficult to perform with one hand! Many people with SPD avoid touching different types of materials but don’t mind plastic. It takes a lot of force to pull these plastic rings off the cord and pulling with force stimulates muscles and joints while strengthening muscles. Adapt for your child or individual: 1) Use rings with larger or smaller holes in the center depending so that they are successful. You can always use rings with smaller holes later as they get stronger. 2) Some of my clients prefer to stand and pace while performing this (See in the video how I tied the cord around my waist while the client pulled the rings off). Other clients prefer sitting at a table or in a chair away from the table. 3) Pulling the rings off takes less motor planning skill and coordination than stringing them on. But some children or clients may be able to or prefer to string. 4) Ring shapes are easier to grasp and manipulate than beads and they don’t roll away. But you may certainly progress onto using large and then smaller beads. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Adapted Ring  Stack for  Individual with  Hemiplegia 1m56s

Adapted Ring Stack for Individual with Hemiplegia

My client is using a ring stack I adapted just for him! I wedged a tube inside the container lid. Next, I attached a dowel for his left hand to grasp so that he is involved in stabilizing the materials. His left hand is spastic and typically fisted, so this is a great way to relax it while he uses his right hand to reach, grasp, position and release the ring shapes. I simply sliced up cylindrical containers or cut holes in lids to make "rings". I can't show his smiling face, but he really enjoys being able to do a hand activity and some days can do it independently! The strap I used to help him keep his left hand on the dowel is sold by https://eazyhold.com/ Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Make-Your-Own Yarn for Plastic Bag Knitting 2m31s

Make-Your-Own Yarn for Plastic Bag Knitting

This video demonstrates how to cut up supermarket plastic bags to make "yarn" used for knitting. I knit bags of different sizes and shapes, usually to hold therapy materials or groceries. People are always impressed when I tell them that they are made of supermarket bags and they are super STRONG. Making yarn works on many fine-motor skills as a child or adult 1) rolls up the supermarket bags 2) snips 4-5 pieces from each bag 3) stretches them open into giant plastic rings 4) knots them into a long chain 5) rolls the chain into a “yarn ball” 6) knits The best part is that all the yarn is free and if you mess up, it costs nothing.... Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Make-Your-Own:  Knot Craft for  Fine-Motor Skills 2m14s

Make-Your-Own: Knot Craft for Fine-Motor Skills

This knot craft is so simple to make! Just cut loops out of old socks or stretchy sleeves. Then children or adults with or without disabilities develop coordination as they create loop chains. Some clients enjoy making the chain grow to shak3, pull or swirl. Others enjoy taking them apart to insert or push down a ring stack. No matter how it’s used, this is an easy, inexpensive way to develop manipulation skills. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Tying or Untying   Knots on Weighted  Bags for Sensory  Processing 1m34s

Tying or Untying Knots on Weighted Bags for Sensory Processing

Here is a fun way to teach how to tie or untie a knot. I inserted plastic bags of sand inside socks, sleeves or other fabric and tied the pink, fleece fabric strips to them. The fleece is thick and easier to manipulate than thin string. I adapted the activity to require matching the colors or fabric designs on the bags. Carrying heavy bags and all the pulling provides sensory stimulation. The client in the video is quite good at tying and untying the knots. Another client enjoyed most of the steps to this task. However, he has poor motor planning skills and required hand-over-hand assistance to grasp and pull apart the fabric ends to tighten the loose knot that I made. Teaching the last step of a task first is a technique called “backward chaining”. My client experiences success as he completes the easiest and final step in the sequence to knot tying. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Pull-Apart-Plastics Develop Fine-Motor Skills 1m30s

Pull-Apart-Plastics Develop Fine-Motor Skills

Pulling-apart these plastic pieces strengthens fingers and is sensory fun! I cut the plastic from bottles and other containers. Next, I attached Velcro Loop to both sides of the green ones and Hook to both sides of the red ones. Some children may be able to stack them up by alternating colors before ripping them apart to insert. This is a wonderful activity that develop eye-hand coordination and bilateral hand skills! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Recycling OT:  Suitcase  Activity with  Developmentally  Disabled Clients 1m50s

Recycling OT: Suitcase Activity with Developmentally Disabled Clients

I love to recycle suitcases, duffle bags and backpacks because the zippers are large and easy to manipulate. I cut away the back of the suitcase shown in the video so that the front piece can be held or attached to a wall. There are 3 zippered pockets filled with objects to remove. This video demonstrates how I individualized the activity for my clients. 1) a blind client sits at the table, using both hands to search inside the pockets 2) a client with flexed posture reaches high as she holds the suitcase with one hand to remove objects with the other hand 3)Clients who love to move- transport the materials to the container located across the room or even in a different room. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Stringing Washers: Great for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders 1m34s

Stringing Washers: Great for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

It is fun to string these washers because they look and feel great! Washers are perfect for children or adults with coordination challenges because they are easy to grasp and won't roll away when dropped. I use thick fabric instead of flimsy string to further promote success. My clients need to use force to push the washers all the way down the fabric strip. Use of force provides sensory stimulation to the muscles and joints in the hands helping children with sensory processing disorders be more aware of their hands and how to use them. The washers get heavy after a while and weight also provides sensory stimulation. Please note that I attached the stringing fabric to cord tied around the table so that the materials cannot be thrown. Washer stringing is repetitive and often calming and as you see in the video some people love the teamwork! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Ring Stack, Shape Sorter  and Stringing for  Individuals with  Developmental Disabilities 1m19s

Ring Stack, Shape Sorter and Stringing for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

I originally cut up a container to make a shape sorter for a blind individual. He pulled the round, triangular or cube shapes from Velcro backings and inserted them into the corresponding holes. But he got bored after a while. So, I cut a hole in the center of the same white container to wedge a tube. This functions as a ring stack. The rings are easy to cut from container lids, other plastic containers or purchase them. Finally, I attached a strip of fabric to the top of the tube for stringing small rings or any objects that have holes in them. This client is blind and non-verbal but understands directions and has very good fine-motor skills. I love giving him variety, especially when there is some problem-solving involved. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make Natural Sun Screen 2m30s

How to Make Natural Sun Screen

This video demonstrates how to make natural sun screen using bee's wax. Stir into the pot equal parts of: 1. purified wax 2. coconut oil 3. olive oil Then slowly stir in 3 tablespoons of zinc oxide. Hubby carefully stirred and alternated pouring the ingredients into two jars so that the contents would be an even consistency. It smells and feels fantastic and best of all works!!! Making and using this sun screen is a wonderful sensory experience and older children or clients may be able to help with some of the steps. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Fidgety Stringing for  Individuals with Autism1m30s

Fidgety Stringing for Individuals with Autism

Children and adults with autism and/or other types of developmental disabilities often love materials that involve pulling, squeezing or pushing. These materials are sensory-based because they stimulate the muscles, joints and skin. I attached retractable clips that hold name IDs to a book stand. They are really fun to pull! I cut lots of ring shapes out of plastic containers, but you can use other small objects with openings that can be strung onto the clips. I tied pieces of fabric to the ends so that the rings won't easily fall off. The thicker the fabric, the more challenging the stringing will be. Have fun adapting! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Bowling for  Children Who are  Unable to Grasp1m26s

Bowling for Children Who are Unable to Grasp

This "bowling alley" is adapted so that children or adults with disabilities do not need to grasp or reach far. All they need to do is push the ball or tubular object that is stabilized with Velcro. I like to vary the sensory qualities so some make sounds, have fun textures, bright colors and even vibrate. Consider adding a switch that is activated when the ball taps it. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Playing Catch with Bags of Sand is Great for Sensory Processing Disorders1m05s

Playing Catch with Bags of Sand is Great for Sensory Processing Disorders

Children or adults with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) often love using heavy materials. I filled plastic sands with sand, placed them inside socks, sleeves or pants legs from old clothing and sewed them closed. Use them in a game of "hot potato", catch with a partner or catch in a group with the player in the center throwing it to others sitting in a circle. This activity works on motor planning skills, strengthening, social skills and attention. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Buttoning Board1m28s

Sensory Buttoning Board

I adapt many activities to use on a large book stand so that my clients need to reach shoulder level. This helps to strengthen the upper extremities, improves posture and promotes visual attention. Use large buttons or make our own by cutting plastic circles out of detergent bottles and then punching holes in them. I attached them to the book stand using elastic cord. My clients love the plush, soft fleece that someone had donated! This tactile sensory experience motivated them to engage as they improved their fine motor control. Some clients enjoyed color matching. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Color Matching for  Children with  Sensory Processing  Disorders 1m41s

Color Matching for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

This color matching activity requires lots of pulling as children match and attach different color rings. Using force stimulates the muscles and joints helping to increase body awareness and motor skills. Some children will enjoy the color matching aspect. Others may prefer to pull the shapes off and insert into the container. In either case, this is a fun, sensory-based learning activity. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Paper Towel Adaptation:  for Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 2m08s

Paper Towel Adaptation: for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

This simple adaptation makes it easier for my client to cut the correct amount of paper towel and fold it in half. She loves to help others so she is preparing a towel for each of her peers to use for lunch. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Busy Bottles for  Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m50s

Busy Bottles for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Children or adults with developmental disabilities often love to manipulate by shaking, pulling, pushing or rolling. This video demonstrates how to make and use a simple make-your-own "busy bottle" activity. It works great for this client because she cannot throw it off her tray or choke on any small moving parts. It was free to make and individualized just for her…. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make Sensory Shoulder or  Lap Pads for Children with Autism 3m17s

How to Make Sensory Shoulder or Lap Pads for Children with Autism

Many children and adults with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) and/or autism spectrum disorders find weighted vests, blankets, collars and lap pads to be calming. This video demonstrates how to make them! This was a great way to put my old sweat shirts, pants and socks to use. Here are the steps: 1) Put sand into a plastic bag and tie the end. 2) Put the plastic bag inside a sock and tie the end 3) Put the sock inside a second sock so that the outer sock can be washed 4) Place these double layered socks either inside an extra long sock or bag for insertion/removal tasks OR 5) Place bags of sand inside the sleeves and body of an old pair of pants or sweatshirt. Tie up all openings so that contents stay inside 6) Place the filled pants or sweatshirt into a second one so that the outer layer can be washed. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Adapt a  Lunch Box to Open  and Close with One Hand 1m45s

How to Adapt a Lunch Box to Open and Close with One Hand

My client is eager to be as independent as possible. He has a developmental disability and had a stroke a few years ago that impaired his right side. His friend sewed the loops onto the lunch box so that he can use his right arm to stabilize it while opening or closing the zipper. I love how he is using his weak arm instead of leaving it hanging at his side. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com