Paramedic Shows How To Perform The Heimlich On Yourself

rumblestaffPublished: February 28, 2014Updated: May 2, 201818,237,863 views
Published: February 28, 2014Updated: May 2, 2018

The world is a scary place and you never know what the future has in store for you around the corner. That is why it is important to prepare yourself for any potential situation that may occur. This is an effective and simple way to save yourself if you're alone and choking, brought to you by a Firefighter/Paramedic ACLS/BLS Instructor Jeff Rehman. Special Thanks to Lt. Mark (Mother) Sherman.

“I have noted over those years that there is really no effective means for someone to rescue themselves should they be choking and nobody is there to help them,” Mr. Rehman says in the video, which has been seen more than 7 million times thus far.

In the clip, he uses a basic push-up motion to create suction to hopefully dislodge the object that is blocking your throat. First, get on your knees in the push-up position, then let go of your arms, essentially letting your stomach and chest smack on the ground. The air that moves out from this technique should be enough to remove whatever is stuck in your airway.

You cannot predict these things when they happen, that's why it is better to be safe than sorry. When you accidentally inhale something and the moment of sheer panic strikes when you start losing your breath, remember Mr. Rehman’s demonstration in order to help yourself quickly and efficiently by doing the Heimlich maneuver on yourself.

In case you would like to know how to perform the Heimlich maneuver on your dog, check out this video demonstrated by a vet.

The Heimlich maneuver, also called abdominal thrusts, is a first aid procedure first described by Dr. Henry Heimlich in 1974. It is used to treat foreign object obstructions to the upper airway. Modern protocols recommend several stages for removing airway obstructions, designed to apply increasingly more pressure. Start by encouraging the victim to cough, followed by a few slaps on the back and finish with abdominal thrusts or chest thrusts as a last resort.

Dr Heimlich claimed that back slaps were actually dangerous in these situations, since these could cause death by further lodging the foreign object into the windpipe of the victim. One Yale study from 1982 persuaded the American Heart Association to stop recommending back slaps or blows, which later turned out to be partially funded by Dr. Heimlich’s own foundation. According to a doctor from Mayo Clinic and the AHA, "There was never any science here. Heimlich overpowered science all along the way with his slick tactics and intimidation, and everyone, including us at the AHA, caved in." Still, both the Mayo Clinic and the European Resuscitation Council recommend alternating between five back slaps and five abdominal thrusts in cases of severe airway obstructions. However, in countries like Australia, authorities believe that there is not enough evidence backed by science to support the use of abdominal thrusts and their use is not recommended in first aid. Instead, chest thrusts are recommended.

However, if you are on your own and this happens, Heimliching yourself might be your best, if not only, option.

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    Comments

    3 comments

    • 1 rumble
      BroncoBob · 45 weeks ago

      Thank you very much for the 'pointer', I too have a right wrist fused from my boxing days. lol. This maneuver just might save someone's life. God Bless.

    • 1 rumble
      arbestmovies · 36 weeks ago

      it's a very helpful video thank you

    • 1 rumble
      killerbean56 · 22 weeks ago

      Thanks so much! What if someone is obese and has a beer belly? I could see where this may not be effective in that case. I've heard about positioning yourself over a chair back. and bending over the back of the chair putting pressure on the diaphragm area, then forcefully bending forward to help dislodge the obstruction... what do you think? Could that work for overweight people???