Robert Bloch Egyptian Tales--Episode 3: "The Brood of Bubastis" (Narrated By Jeffrey LeBlanc)

Published December 12, 2020 21 Views

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A terrified son tries to save his hypnotized father from the god Anubis. The curse of Scarabaeus crawls out for a reckoning on a mummy thief. And in Cornwall, a young man has dinner with the Egyptian god Bubastis, as we continue a series of Egyptian tales from Robert Bloch. The Egyptian gods invite you to chew the fat with them on this one.

Our third episode is “The Brood of Bubastis”. This horrific tale was published in the March 1937 issue of Weird Tales and continues our Robert Bloch Egyptian series. This was the last Bloch story Howard Phillips Lovecraft saw his young pupil write before his untimely death.

As stated by Weird Tales:
A shuddery story of a ghastly charnel crypt in a weird cave in the hills of Cornwall!

The story concerns our narrator’s visit to his friend Malcolm Kent in Cornwall. Malcolm has become obsessed with a lost Egyptian cult in England.

What dark mystery will our narrator learn in the crypt of Cornwall from Malcolm Kent? Can our suicidal narrator solve this Egyptian puzzle in time to feed his cat? --JL