These Two Dogs Just Can't Stop Hugging Each Other

Published January 28, 2020 13,285 Views $8.46 earned

Rumble / Dogs & PuppiesHave you ever thought that dogs could fall in love? Probably not, since most people think that only people have the ability to fall in love, but in reality they are wrong. It is proven that dogs can feel emotions like people, so they can enjoy songs and hugs in sad or exciting moments. These two dogs called Jake and Ginger can't stop hugging, because they love each other a lot and know that hugging is good for both of you to be happy. On top of that, Jake and Ginger are smart enough to smile and hug in front of the camera so everyone can see how much they love each other. This is the cutest thing you'll see today!

People in our egocentric thinking believe that human beings are the only ones who can enjoy emotions or feelings, but the reality is that all living beings feel, even if it is differently. Emotions and feelings are not the same in people and neither are they in animals compared to us or between species, but what matters is that in one way or another, emotions are always present in people.

Dog owners know that their pets love them and that they are very likely to feel love for them, even if it is a different love, it is love after all. There is a study that states that love is chemically evident in dogs when they look at their owners.

The study was conducted by researchers from several Japanese universities and consists of two parts. In the first part, the researchers looked at 30 dog owners who interacted with their dogs for half an hour and then the dogs and humans were measured with oxytocin in each, and oxytocin is also known as the love hormone. This hormone is essential for human intimacy, but it is also released during sex and creates the union between couples if that were not enough it also plays a fundamental role in the relationship between mother and children.

The researchers found that the owners of the dogs they looked at the most had higher levels of oxytocin. On the other hand, the levels of oxytocin and dog owners were correlated: if an owner had higher levels of oxytocin after the interaction, the dog also had high levels of oxytocin.

In general, the results suggest that domesticated dogs may have developed a mutually beneficial ability to emotionally bond with humans, in the same way that some people bond with others. There was an essay by Evan MacLean and Brian Hare, where these cognitive scientists commented that dogs have taken advantage of human sensitivities and parents' behaviors such as staring into the eyes to generate feelings of social reward and caregiver behavior. In other words, dogs evoke the same love that parents feel for their children.

Other scientific research shows that the dog's mind is equivalent to that of a human being between one year and a half and two years old with respect to mental and emotional abilities. Is a two-year-old child able to love deeply? He may not have developed all the emotions, he may not understand them at all, but what is clear is that they do feel love for their parents every day, just like dogs for their owners or for other dogs.

Jake and Ginger preciously hug each other for the camera. Cuteness overload!