Captured Sky Art Phenomenon Compilation

Published January 12, 2019 0 Plays

Rumble Occurred on September, 2018 / Whitewrite, Texas, USA

Info from Licensor: "This collection of videos shows a look at a one-of-a-kind aerial artform known as Captured Sky. Creator and professional skydiver Michelle Nirumandrad, takes canvas and paint with her as she jumps, releasing the paints while in free-fall or under canopy, allowing the winds of the sky to paint the canvas for her. The artwork is crafted entirely above ground, by the sky, and is untouched by human hand. After drying, Nirumandrad burns the conception information for the pieces into the back of their canvas frame with a wood tool. This information includes the date the piece was jumped, name, how much sky it captured, which is the amount of time the piece spent at terminal velocity, and a description of the sky at the time it was caught. In this way, the pieces remain bound to the details of their conception which play an intrinsic role in appreciating what they are; a piece of the intangible, a piece of Captured Sky. Nirumandrad creates in this manner in an effort to help bridge the inherent gap that exists between man and the heavens, by allowing the sky to create, we give her the opportunity to lend us a piece of herself. If you love the ocean, she can give you a shell. Love the mountains, he can give you a stone. And now, if you love the sky, she can give you her art. These videos show Nirumandrad in free fall flying on her back at speeds upwards of 130mph while releasing paints into the wind. She exits at 13,500ft, about 2.5 miles above the Earth. She deploys her canopy around 5,000ft and continues to release paints into the winds until entering a landing pattern to return safely to the ground. Included are videos of the finished artwork as well as what her skydiving rig looks like after jumping and before being cleaned/maintained for another jump. Nirumandrad has been jumping for more that 10 years and has over 3,000 skydives. She has been working on Captured Sky for the past six years."

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