Majestic Sable Antelopes Gather Near Human

NataliaCaraPublished: August 7, 2018Updated: August 8, 2018317 plays$0.37 earned
Published: August 7, 2018Updated: August 8, 2018

These beautiful Sable Antelopes live in a reserve where they can roam around freely all day and not worry about hunters. Even though they are always grazing and browsing, every once in a while they are given pellets, and being approached by such amazing animals is quite the experience! During the grazing, the group can spread out, but the animals try to stay within sight of each other. The maker of this video managed to record a rare sighting of Sable Antelopes almost interacting with a human in the wild.

But, apart from having seen a specimen in the zoo what do we know about the most elegant antelope on the planet?

The Sable Antelope, also known as African or Black Antelope (Hippotragus niger for scientists), is a beautiful and graceful animal with a number of distinctive features that are not characteristic of other species of antelope. Both males and females of the species have horns distinguished with a large number of rings and have a semicircular, curved back shape. Their horns can reach about 160 cm in length, and their ends are incredibly sharp. Crescent and powerful, they are so sharp that they are often compared to the famous Turkish sword. This beauty has its price: the horns are still considered one of the most valuable trophies that can be obtained which puts the fragile creature's existence in terrible peril: many hunters dream of this decoration for their hunting collections and collectors are happy to pay any price.

This is the reason why in the early twentieth century, the number of black antelopes began to decline sharply. To save the species, the authorities restricted hunting for it - especially for foreign tourists to whom were mandated expensive licenses, which were not so easy to get.

But local residents could bypass this ban. In addition, the demand for antelope horns has only increased. Therefore, immediately there appeared enterprising businessmen who organized the sale of valuable trophies.

And as you could see in the video at the top of the page, antelopes, as most grazers are meek and inquisitive. They approached the filmer carefully and gradually and in the end, they exposed themselves in such a way that any person could take advantage of.

The adult male black antelope weighs about 280 kg. Its height at the withers is 117-140 cm with a body length of 190-210 cm. The females are not much smaller and slimmer: they weigh 240 kg with a body length of 130-150 cm. On both sides of the neck, there is a hard black mane, from 10 to 12 cm. The tip of the tail is decorated with a tassel.

The color of the black antelope's coat depends on sex and age. Young males and adult females are usually of a dark chestnut color, but older males have charcoal-black fur. Only their belly is completely white. In addition, both sexes have a light pattern on their muzzles whisch is, like our fingerprints, unique for each individual.

Black antelopes live in large herds. If there are enough water and pastures, then adult females with cubs adhere to the territory of one male. Leaders mark the boundaries of their lands with piles of manure and regularly update them. In addition, they leave visual marks as well: they use their sharp horns and heavy hooves to break and trample on a border-marking bush.

Alpha-males actively protect their harem from uninvited visitors. During the fight, they kneel like horses and menacingly direct their magnificent antlers toward the enemy.

Between females, too, a certain hierarchy is established. They can even fight with each other to prove their right to a higher position. At the same time, they are standing shoulder to shoulder by other females should their young be in danger. Very often, female Sable Antelopes are known to drive off even lioness, and during such fights, it does not matter whose cub was in trouble.

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