Sensitive Dog Shames Owner But Quickly Forgives

Published March 27, 2017 693,517 Plays $1,591.43 earned

Rumble / Dogs & PuppiesWhat happens when this loving dog’s owner asks for forgiveness? She gets it, of course. No other animal has as broad shoulders or as big a heart as the canine. Sure, he may try to play head games with you, turn his head, or give you a sidelong glance to let you know “you done wrong.” But in the end, all your failings and flaws are small bumps in the road to love.

Samson is outside his house, waiting patiently, even stoically for his mistress to return from that place she disappears to at least once a day. Will she ever come back home to take care of me? Since dogs are learning animals—they must learn even the most basic routines, after all, we should expect that our adult dog has already learned that we do return. If that were not true, then what would be the point of waiting?

Is Samson really all that concerned? He certainly has a vacant look, but what does it mean? He emits a slight squeal, eventually, but that could just be a response to his owner’s emotional pleas and vocalizations. Maybe he thinks she is the one who’s distraught, and needs the attention. For all we know Samson was enjoying a quiet standing meditation by himself.

“I’m perfectly content to stand here and wait,” thinks Samson. “I know you’ll come home. You’ve been leaving and returning at the same time for two years now, why would it be any different today?”

It looks like a pleasant day out. It’s not raining. Even if it is a little chilly for us humans, Samson’s thick coat of fur should protect him from the elements. He is a thoughtful, considerate listener; however, as the woman goes on about how much Samson must have missed her.

“I know it hurts,” she says reassuringly.

“It does? Oh, yes…of course, it hurts,” replies Samson in thought, playing the same “I’m a poor lonely dog” game that ultimately concludes with a treat, a bowl of food, or some head scratching, and if history is any indicator, quite likely all three!

Samson can easily go along with the game. His ego isn’t that demanding. He’s a domesticated dog, after all, and no animal can suck up to the leader of a pack better than a dog can. He is supremely skilled at self-deprecation, a trait acquired long ago from his wolf ancestors.

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