Pilot Shows Off His Amazing Skills As He Lands Plane With Malfunctioning Gear

rumblestaffPublished: June 30, 2014Updated: December 14, 20173,807,646 views
Published: June 30, 2014Updated: December 14, 2017

More often than not we hear of people being afraid of flying. Although some might say there is no reason to be, the fact is that traveling airborne is a fairly new thing compared to the other methods of transportation. To top it all off, the stories that we hear about it can make us want to stay rooted to the ground as much as possible. Even the most innocent problematic landings can be so traumatic, we might never want to fly in a plane again.

Did you know that there are approximately 5000 commercial airplanes in the sky at any given moment? Do you think that that’s impossible and that the sky couldn’t possibly fit that many at a time? Well, just think about the fact that beside the commercial planes carrying passengers and cargo, there are also military planes and other aircrafts crisscrossing the sky. It’s truly remarkable.

This footage shows us the rational and quick thinking of one member of the U.S. Military when he had to land a plane vertically on a padded stool. U.S. Marine Corps Capt. William Mahoney, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 263 (Reinforced) 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), AV-8B Harrier aircraft pilot, talks about his experience during a controlled landing after his front landing gear malfunctioned on his aircraft aboard the USS Bataan at sea, on June 7, 2014.

Elements of the 22nd MEU, embarked aboard Bataan, are operating in the U.S. 6th fleet area of operations to augment U.S. Crisis Response forces in the region.

After the nose gear on this AV-8B Harrier malfunctioned shortly after takeoff, Capt. William Mahoney had to execute a Vertical Landing on the top deck of the USS Bataan using a modified padded stool.

In the video, Capt. Mahoney explains that he knew the aircraft is experiencing a problem shortly after taking off, so he radioed the ship and flew past the control tower at 300 feet, hoping they would be able to assess the issue from afar. Since this was not such a case, the Captain had to land the 46-foot-long, 31,000-pound jet with an improvised procedure, where he had to support the nose of the Harrier on a padded stool, built specifically for such an emergency. He says he couldn’t see the stool, but he knew it was there. The deck had been evacuated, in the event of the jet crashing.

Being in the military is hard for both the soldier and the family. It’s hard to leave the comfort and the love of your close ones and fly all the way to the other side of the planet, but it’s what’s necessary. It’s knowing that the sacrifices you’re making will guarantee the safety of your loved ones.

Credit to the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit.

What did you think about this video? Make sure you tell us more in the comments down below. If you like what you see, don’t forget to share it with others who might like it as well. It just might be the highlight of their day! Enjoy!

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Comments

8 comments

  • 5 rumbles
    GETFSHN · 1 year ago

    You sir are an example of how the USAF, US Marines, US Navy, and US Army Pilots are trained. Great landing. U are a credit to your unit. Sonny Covin B25 Pilot.

  • 2 rumbles
    DorothyShea · 1 year ago

    Congrats, Capt. Mahoney, on a jaw-dropping, spot-on, picture-perfect landing. Your skills, and calm wits are admirable.

  • 1 rumble
    NRHTX · 1 year ago

    Amazing pilot.

  • 1 rumble
    Phil_Cooper · 1 year ago

    It looked as if the "stool" was in such a position that the ground crew were probably able to lower the gear manually after that pinpoint landing and simply roll the jet off the flight deck to the elevator.

  • 1 rumble
    Noel · 50 weeks ago

    My uncle Lt Colonel Andy Boquet had to crash land his Harrier when it overheated during an airshow with the Blue Angels many many years ago ... he got out of it with a broken nose. I didnt realize they still used Harriers ... very cool.. you did a great job!

  • 2 rumbles
    Infinity · 48 weeks ago

    Why is the stool only wide enough to accomodate a pin-point landing? Why not make something 10' wide to allow for margin or error?

  • 1 rumble
    Phil7793 · 33 weeks ago

    Credit to one of the best BRITISH inventions ever!!

  • 1 rumble
    DJvapor · 23 weeks ago

    Well done! I salute you!