RecyclingOT's Videos

Make Your Own Apple Toys for Preschoolers2m58s

Make Your Own Apple Toys for Preschoolers

This video demonstrates 3 different apple fine motor activities made out of plastic bottles. Bending and lacing plastic apples strengthens fingers and develops eye-hand coordination. Inserting or removing worms from apples is great pretend play and pushing the circles down hard to decorate the big apple develops the motor control needed to grasp a pencil. These activities are fun and help both typically developing children and children with challenges such as autism to build hand skills. Learn more in my books and website at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Crossing Midline Alphabet Sequencing for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders 1m57s

Crossing Midline Alphabet Sequencing for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

Some children with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) avoid crossing midline. Imagine a line running down your body dividing it into right and left sides. This line is called “Midline”. Sometimes your right hand will cross over left of this line and your left hand will cross right of this line. We describe this as "crossing midline" (CML). Children with SPD often avoid crossing midline. They may only reach for objects on their right with their right hand and only reach for objects on their left with their left hand. This is not very efficient, especially when they color with whichever hand is closest to the crayon rather than the dominant hand. Activities such as the one in the video are designed to promote CML. Ask the child to alternate using right and left hands while sequencing the letters and at times they will need to cross midline. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Fun Activities that Develop Buttoning Skills 4m00s

Fun Activities that Develop Buttoning Skills

Children with sensory processing disorders or developmental disabilities such as autism- may find it challenging to learn how to open and close buttons. The adaptations shown in this video are designed to make learning easier by using large materials and repetition. So parents, teachers and therapists consider making "button squares", "button stringing", "button rings" and "button boards" to develop these hand skills. Learn more on my website at RecyclingOT.com

Make-Your-Own Buckle Manipulation Toys 2m50s

Make-Your-Own Buckle Manipulation Toys

Parents, therapists and teachers.... cut up your round containers to make toy buckles. Pushing the tab in and out of the notches develops strong fingers and eye-hand coordination. Use super large food containers for large rings and smaller shampoo bottles for smaller rings. Children can choose to buckle, pull rings open, toss them onto a ring stack or even string them on big strips of fabric. This activity is especially beneficial for children or adults with fine motor challenges who may struggle to close a belt. Make-Your-own buckles are easier than using real belt buckles and there is opportunity for REPETITION! Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Simple Social Ball Game 1m20s

Simple Social Ball Game

Children and adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy this simple ball game. I filled up a long sock with sensory type objects like bells, marbles, foam, etc. and tied the ends to handles. The handles you see in the video were cut from large bottles but you can create any type of handle you choose as long as it is easy and comfortable to grasp. Players are learning to follow my directions. Perhaps after they learn the steps to this routine another client can position the balls on the table. That will take teamwork! This activity works on developing motor planning skills, visual attention and social skills. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

How to Make Vibrating Candy Cane Ring Stacks for Children with Autism 4m35s

How to Make Vibrating Candy Cane Ring Stacks for Children with Autism

Children and adults with autism, sensory processing disorders or developmental disabilities often engage better and enjoy using materials that vibrate. The vibration provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints and the sound helps them stay focused. This video demonstrates 2 different types of ring stacks made inexpensively from plastic candy canes and rings cut out of detergent bottles. As an occupational therapist, I look for ways to adapt activities so that my clients are motivated to engage, focus, use their hands together and develop new skills. Learn more at RecyclingOT.com

Creating Push and Squeeze Activities for students with Sensory Processing Disorders 1m51s

Creating Push and Squeeze Activities for students with Sensory Processing Disorders

Students or clients with sensory processing disorders often engage best when using materials that require force. These activities provide "resistance" and heavy pressure sensory stimulation to muscles and joints. The video shows how motivated and fun it is to get sensory stimulation while also strengthening hands and developing coordination. Please visit my website for more information at RecyclingOT .com

How to Make a Jig for Coloring 3m48s

How to Make a Jig for Coloring

My client has spastic hands and is unable to use them. This video demonstrates how to make a jig for someone like her so that she can color. I used this at work and discovered that 1) she loved it 2) its a great way to open her hand, stretch and move her arm bit and... 3) her knuckles were pressing so hard into the plastic her skin got red. Watch the video to see how I revised the jig so that her knuckles press into soft fabric instead of plastic. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Form Board Picture Activity for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities 2m11s

Form Board Picture Activity for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Form boards are designed for young children to learn how to fit shapes into corresponding openings. My older clients with developmental disabilities are also working on these skills. However, this form board is made with meaningful, age-appropriate pictures that I printed and laminated. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

How to Adapt a  Lunch Box to Open  and Close with One Hand 1m45s

How to Adapt a Lunch Box to Open and Close with One Hand

My client is eager to be as independent as possible. He has a developmental disability and had a stroke a few years ago that impaired his right side. His friend sewed the loops onto the lunch box so that he can use his right arm to stabilize it while opening or closing the zipper. I love how he is using his weak arm instead of leaving it hanging at his side. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Stretchy Ring and Ball Activity for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders 1m33s

Stretchy Ring and Ball Activity for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

Children and adults with autism, sensory processing disorders or other developmental disabilities often engage best when materials provide stimulation that meets their sensory needs. For example, it feels good to push and pull a ball attached to the table with elastic cord. This client needs frequent prompts to persist at most activities. However, he enjoys this type of sensory stimulation- the sensation to skin, muscles and joints as he pushes and pulls materials. Learn more about adapting activities for children or adults with autism, sensory processing disorders or other developmental disabilities on my web site: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Spider and Web Fine-Motor Activity1m55s

Spider and Web Fine-Motor Activity

Wrap and knot cord all over a weighted ball and then tie several black fabric strips all over them. Some of my clients love to untie the "spider legs" and then insert them into the "web". The weighted ball is calming to use on one's lap or table. Children and adults with fine-motor challenges will have a fun opportunity to develop strong fingers and dexterity as they repetitively tie or untie these knots. Learn more about sensory activities and adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Types of Cues/Prompts to Support Learning 3m36s

Types of Cues/Prompts to Support Learning

This video demonstrates the types of cues or prompts that may be used to support learning in educational or training settings. These include: 1) Hand over hand assistance 2) physical assistance 3) touch prompts 3) point cues and 4) verbal cues. I frequently use a combination of these supports. For example, I might give physical assistance to reach toward the spoon and then a touch and verbal cue to bring it to his mouth. As a person practices a skill, try to provide the least amount of prompting needed in order to be successful. In addition, pictures may be used, especially when teaching a multi-step task such as laundry or setting the table. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website at: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Fidgety Stringing for  Individuals with Autism1m30s

Fidgety Stringing for Individuals with Autism

Children and adults with autism and/or other types of developmental disabilities often love materials that involve pulling, squeezing or pushing. These materials are sensory-based because they stimulate the muscles, joints and skin. I attached retractable clips that hold name IDs to a book stand. They are really fun to pull! I cut lots of ring shapes out of plastic containers, but you can use other small objects with openings that can be strung onto the clips. I tied pieces of fabric to the ends so that the rings won't easily fall off. The thicker the fabric, the more challenging the stringing will be. Have fun adapting! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Pull-Apart-Plastics Develop Fine-Motor Skills 1m30s

Pull-Apart-Plastics Develop Fine-Motor Skills

Pulling-apart these plastic pieces strengthens fingers and is sensory fun! I cut the plastic from bottles and other containers. Next, I attached Velcro Loop to both sides of the green ones and Hook to both sides of the red ones. Some children may be able to stack them up by alternating colors before ripping them apart to insert. This is a wonderful activity that develop eye-hand coordination and bilateral hand skills! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Make Your Own Paint Easel 1m40s

Make Your Own Paint Easel

Painting on an easel is fun for children and adults. I made this easel out of a cardboard box. Its easy to make and replace when someone accidentally throws it out! I use easels with children and adults with developmental and other disabilities because they make it easier for the client to reach and see how to move the brush. They also sit more upright when looking and reaching in the vertical plane. The client in the video is unable to grasp the paint brush unless it is attached to his hand with the cuff sold at EaZyHold.com. Now he is all set to enjoy painting....Learn more about activity adaptations at RecyclingOT.com

Strengthening the  Tripod Grasp  Fingers 1m40s

Strengthening the Tripod Grasp Fingers

A "tripod" pencil grasp is considered most efficient during handwriting. The term “tripod” is used because 3 fingers- the index, middle fingers and thumb look like a tripod when controlling the pencil. Young children strengthen and develop coordination between the “tripod fingers” when squeezing clothespins, chip clips or tongs. This video demonstrates how to make and use similar "tongs" in repetitive fine-motor activities that young children or adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Weighted Backpack  for Sensory Processing  Disorders 1m30s

Weighted Backpack for Sensory Processing Disorders

Many children and adults with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) find weighted vests, blankets, collars and lap pads to be calming. This video demonstrates one of my clients enjoying the sensation of wearing a backpack filled with bottles of sand. I also stuffed a dog toy inside so that she can enjoy deep pressure fun when pressing against a wall to make it squeak. She is often flapping her arms around so I added the socks to pull or hold onto for additional movement and deep pressure sensory stimulation Learn more about activity adaptations on my website: http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Make-Your-Own:  Knot Craft for  Fine-Motor Skills 2m14s

Make-Your-Own: Knot Craft for Fine-Motor Skills

This knot craft is so simple to make! Just cut loops out of old socks or stretchy sleeves. Then children or adults with or without disabilities develop coordination as they create loop chains. Some clients enjoy making the chain grow to shak3, pull or swirl. Others enjoy taking them apart to insert or push down a ring stack. No matter how it’s used, this is an easy, inexpensive way to develop manipulation skills. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Adapting Velcro Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders 1m49s

Adapting Velcro Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders

Ripping Velcro off backings is a great sensory activity because pulling stimulates the muscles, tendons and joints and at the same time provides auditory feedback with the ripping sound. The Loop Velcro covered board shown in the video can be positioned to promote reaching, trunk rotation and visual attention since the materials on the wall are easier to see than if on the table. If children or adults with developmental disabilities have difficulty learning how to attach loop and hook sides together, simply apply bright nail polish to the non-velcro side that you want facing up. Ripping longer or stronger pieces of Velcro from backings requires using both hands together-helping individuals with sensory processing disorders to develop bilateral hand skills, visual engagement and sequencing skills. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Fidget Tools for Sensory Processing and Anxiety Disorders 9m25s

Fidget Tools for Sensory Processing and Anxiety Disorders

This video demonstrates a variety of fidget tools or toys designed to help children or adults with sensory processing disorders and/or anxiety to promote focus and decrease agitation. Learn more about sensory processing disorders, autism and activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Bottle Coloring and Erasing to Develop Pencil Control 1m48s

Bottle Coloring and Erasing to Develop Pencil Control

Coloring and erasing with a dry erase marker is fun! The little girl in the video is developing dexterity to control a pencil, marker or other writing tool as she flips it over to erase and back to color more. This is an easy and quick activity to cut out of a large bottle. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

Busy Bottles for  Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m50s

Busy Bottles for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Children or adults with developmental disabilities often love to manipulate by shaking, pulling, pushing or rolling. This video demonstrates how to make and use a simple make-your-own "busy bottle" activity. It works great for this client because she cannot throw it off her tray or choke on any small moving parts. It was free to make and individualized just for her…. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Buttoning Board1m28s

Sensory Buttoning Board

I adapt many activities to use on a large book stand so that my clients need to reach shoulder level. This helps to strengthen the upper extremities, improves posture and promotes visual attention. Use large buttons or make our own by cutting plastic circles out of detergent bottles and then punching holes in them. I attached them to the book stand using elastic cord. My clients love the plush, soft fleece that someone had donated! This tactile sensory experience motivated them to engage as they improved their fine motor control. Some clients enjoyed color matching. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com