RecyclingOT's Videos

Fidgety Stringing for  Individuals with Autism1m30s

Fidgety Stringing for Individuals with Autism

Children and adults with autism and/or other types of developmental disabilities often love materials that involve pulling, squeezing or pushing. These materials are sensory-based because they stimulate the muscles, joints and skin. I attached retractable clips that hold name IDs to a book stand. They are really fun to pull! I cut lots of ring shapes out of plastic containers, but you can use other small objects with openings that can be strung onto the clips. I tied pieces of fabric to the ends so that the rings won't easily fall off. The thicker the fabric, the more challenging the stringing will be. Have fun adapting! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Bowling for  Children Who are  Unable to Grasp1m26s

Bowling for Children Who are Unable to Grasp

This "bowling alley" is adapted so that children or adults with disabilities do not need to grasp or reach far. All they need to do is push the ball or tubular object that is stabilized with Velcro. I like to vary the sensory qualities so some make sounds, have fun textures, bright colors and even vibrate. Consider adding a switch that is activated when the ball taps it. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Playing Catch with Bags of Sand is Great for Sensory Processing Disorders1m05s

Playing Catch with Bags of Sand is Great for Sensory Processing Disorders

Children or adults with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) often love using heavy materials. I filled plastic sands with sand, placed them inside socks, sleeves or pants legs from old clothing and sewed them closed. Use them in a game of "hot potato", catch with a partner or catch in a group with the player in the center throwing it to others sitting in a circle. This activity works on motor planning skills, strengthening, social skills and attention. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Buttoning Board1m28s

Sensory Buttoning Board

I adapt many activities to use on a large book stand so that my clients need to reach shoulder level. This helps to strengthen the upper extremities, improves posture and promotes visual attention. Use large buttons or make our own by cutting plastic circles out of detergent bottles and then punching holes in them. I attached them to the book stand using elastic cord. My clients love the plush, soft fleece that someone had donated! This tactile sensory experience motivated them to engage as they improved their fine motor control. Some clients enjoyed color matching. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com