Unreal Animals

Giant Pacific Octopus totally engulfs scuba diver3m16s

Giant Pacific Octopus totally engulfs scuba diver

This incredible footage was recorded by Dennis Chow at Dillon Rock near the amazing Browning Pass, just north of Port Hardy on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. While exploring a wall during this particular dive, Dennis, Shaz and Wes noticed a Giant Pacific Octopus hiding among the rocks and plant life of the wall. These creatures can grow to a 16 foot span and weight upwards of 110 pounds. As you will see in this amazing footage, the creature had transformed to replicate his surroundings. The amazing part about this is that they are colorblind but are still able to duplicate the color and texture of their surroundings when feeling threatened by a predator. These divers are extremely experienced scuba instructors and dive shop owners. At no time was this animal at harm, nor was it not at the top of their list of priorities of maintaining its safety and well being. Once Shaz began coaxing this creature out for a better look at his impressive size, you notice he too starts to "check out" Shaz by extending out a few legs to test what was near. Once he started to fully engage with Shaz, Wes was definitely near to ensure her safety at all times. Octopus will engulf its prey as this one did with Shaz, and then if its regular food, inject crustaceans like crabs with a paralyzing saliva then dismember them with their beaks. This guy definitely had Shaz in his grip, until Wes decided it was time to help release him and go back to his normal habitat. Incredible!

Elephant Attackes Safari Jeep51s

Elephant Attackes Safari Jeep

Professional safari guide Johann Lombard experienced something like never before after this intense elephant attack. Despite all precautions taken, sometimes the animals do act out without any provocation. Luckily everyone was okay! According to Wikipedia, “musth is a periodic condition in male elephants, characterized by highly aggressive behavior and accompanied by a large rise in reproductive hormones. Testosterone levels in an elephant in musth can be as much as 60 times greater than in the same elephant at other times. However, whether this hormonal surge is the sole cause of musth, or merely a contributing factor, is unknown. Scientific investigation of musth is problematic because even the most placid elephants become highly violent toward humans and other elephants during musth.” Cases of rogue elephants randomly attacking native villages or goring and killing rhinoceroses without provocation in national parks in Africa have been documented and attributed to musth in young male elephants, especially those growing in the absence of older males. Studies show that reintroducing older males into the elephant population of the area seems to prevent the younger ones from entering musth, and therefore, stop this destructive behavior. The tourists on the safari tour saw this behavior first hand, but luckily for them, nothing happened and everyone was okay.

Snoek
Published: October 21, 201310,150 views