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Sea turtle casually swims through group of scuba divers27s

Sea turtle casually swims through group of scuba divers

Pacific green sea turtles are a frequent enough sight in the waters around the Galapagos Islands. But getting a close look is a treat that doesn't happen every day. Shy and reclusive, they will move away from divers unless the approach is extremely slow and cautious. It is very unusual to have a sea turtle approach a human, as this one did. Whether it was indifference, or curiosity, the turtle headed straight for the divers and swam through the group. This is a remote area, Known as Kicker Rock, off the coast of San Cristobal Island. Although the turtle has undoubtedly seen people underwater before, diving and tourism is heavily regulated and very limited in the Galapagos Islands, and this turtle would not likely have seen humans often. Expectations for proper behavior here are extremely high and it is almost certain that the turtles enjoy more respectful and predictable interactions on those rare occasions where they do meet people close up. Gone are the days when people would hang onto sea turtles for pictures, or for rides, especially in this protected area. In fact, the waters around the Galapagos Islands make up the world's second largest protected marine sanctuary. Scuba divers here appreciate the privilege of being allowed to enter and the guides are strict. People who don't obey the rules with respect to the wildlife find that their scuba diving or their visits promptly come to an end. This turtle is a fully grown, mature female. They look identical to male green sea turtles except for three obvious differences. The male has a slightly larger head than the female. His tail is also much larger. The tail of this female is less than 1/4 the size of a similarly sized male's tail. A third, but less obvious difference is the presence of small white hooks on the leading edge of the front fins, approximately halfway out from the body. These hooks help the males hang onto the females during courtship and mating encounters. As this turtle calmly swam through the divers, it swam directly in front of the camera and provided us with a beautiful view of it swimming gracefully out into the blue ocean.

Super relaxed bunny rabbit floats in the pool1m17s

Super relaxed bunny rabbit floats in the pool

Kylie decided to give her 4-month-old rabbit named Toffie a swimming lesson. As Toffie was placed inside the water she just floated as though she played dead! Toffie then later proved to her owners that she is a natural born swimmer!

Glenda
Published: December 3, 20184,248 views
Swimmer spots shark trailing hook and line from its mouth37s

Swimmer spots shark trailing hook and line from its mouth

While swimming in the Galapagos Islands, this swimmer found himself to be the object of fascination for several large sharks. In fact, at times, they were surrounding him. Swimming in the Galapagos Islands is a beautiful experience. This diver was on a cruise boat that headed for the remote and fascinating world of Darwin’s Arch and Wolf Island, an area of the ocean where three major currents come together and bring with them an abundance of food for larger animals. The water is alive with sea turtles, fish, and sharks. After the last dive of the day, this tourist couldn’t resist slipping into the water beside the boat and swimming in the clear, blue water. Although he knew there were sharks, he wasn’t expecting them to suddenly surround him. A diver in the water is one thing, but one on the surface seems to attract a lot more attention. The sharks swam around and under him. A few even came up to look right into his camera. But surprisingly, one of the sharks had a metallic object in his mouth. It was a large hook with a wire and fishing line trailing behind. Fishing is highly regulated in the Galapagos Islands, but it does take place. The hammerheads also migrate a long distance, as do the sea turtles, whale sharks, and other large creatures. It is very possible that the hook has been in the mouth of this shark for a very long time. Stainless steel hooks are slow to rust and it’s a myth that there are enzymes in a fish’s mouth that makes them rot quickly. This hook might be in the shark’s mouth for a long time to come too. Fishing for hammerhead sharks is not a widespread practice. It is more likely that the shark was hooked accidentally as it took bait that was meant for another catch. It does not appear, however, that this shark is particularly bothered by this hook as it seems to still be healthy and active.

Bearded Dragon chases laser pointer like a cat26s

Bearded Dragon chases laser pointer like a cat

This bearded dragon chases laser pointers around like a cat, thinking it's a tasty bug. This is used as a form of mental enrichment and exercise. Pet bearded dragons often have obesity issues due to lack of movement and a diet too high in insects/protein, so this keeps him active without a fatty reward. Don't worry, his owners made sure to give him treats afterwards!

twobadgals
Published: December 4, 20187 plays$8.12 earned