Researchers have developed a way to make a battery and its casing stretchy, enabling future advancements in wearable electronics.

SeekerPublished: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018
Published: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018

We already wear technology, from Apple watches to devices that monitor our vitals for medical reasons. There are even researchers in Sweden developing an in-body intranet that can link all wearable medical devices! As more and more things become integrated into our bodies, batteries will have to follow.

Right now, batteries are rigid, meaning whatever you put them in -- like a cell phone -- has to be rigid. Then there's that pesky issue where lithium-ion batteries in cellphones have a tendency to explode when bent or punctured.

We're going to need a different power solution before we can better integrate personal devices around our flexible bodies, and we're already seeing some early flexible battery technologies in the making. One recent development isn't the battery elements but a binding agent for the elements.

But let's back up for just a second. All batteries are like little columns or bricks. The internal elements are: the negatively charged anode, the positively charged cathode, and some kind of the electrolyte that separates them.

Once the circuit is closed - say when a battery is put in a flashlight - electrons can travel from the anode to the cathode, powering the light bulb along the way.

So back to this new thing: a team of researchers have created a new kind of glue that can bind battery elements together with hydrogels. 

 

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