Meat was an essential part of early human evolution, but that was millions of years ago. Do we still need it?

SeekerPublished: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018
Published: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018

It’s not entirely known when humans started eating meat, but we can learn a lot about it from studying our evolutionary cousins. Chimpanzees, for example, are meat eaters, whilst Gorillas are herbivores. At what point did our common ancestor choose steak over the potato?

Believe it or not, most of our human ancestors were vegetarian. Back then, everything had to do with niches and competition-- there were a lot of predators and a lot of prey, so you had to compete. Starting with the first primate ever, Purgatorius, to the Australopithecus around 3 or 4 million years ago, our ancestors were still eating mainly plants.

But, somewhere around 2.5 million years ago, our ancestors evolved to have intestines more suitable for eating meat and they started being able to make the tools needed to obtain it.  After that, the meaty floodgates opened. But what about humans today? Can we survive without the meat that got us here?

This video, "Meat was an essential part of early human evolution, but that was millions of years ago. Do we still need it?", first appeared on seeker.com.

Be the first to suggest a tag

    Comments

    0 comments