When it comes to sex, Bonobos do it all. There is, however, science behind all these sexual encounters. So why exactly do bonobos randevu round the clock?

SeekerPublished: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018
Published: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018

Bonobos and common chimpanzees share around 99% of their genetic code with humans. However, there are some massive differences when it comes to the ways these two primate species approach sex.

For Bonobos, sex is used as a way to form strong social bonds and ease tension within the troupe. Bonobos engage in full mouth and tongue kissing, face-to-face sex and oral sex in both hetero and homosexual contexts. Males partake in pseudocopulation with each other - where one briefly rubs his scrotum against the buttocks of another. This can become a group activity if many males engage at the same time. Female bonobos have been observed actually achieving orgasm, exhibiting telltale signs such as increased blood pressure and heart rate, and a series of involuntary muscle spasms. A sign that females are equally as valued in bonobo communities. Common chimpanzees, on the other hand, have a very different approach to sex. Males are defensive of their favorite ladies and can get violent if any unfamiliar chimps wander into their territory. Female chimps have little say when it comes to sex. Unlike bonobos, males are not likely to take care of their females’ needs.

The bottom line is, unlike common Chimpanzees, any kind of conflict or activity in Bonobo society is directly addressed with sexual healing. They are the true biological equivalent of a society that makes love and not war.

This video, "When it comes to sex, Bonobos do it all. There is, however, science behind all these sexual encounters. So why exactly do bonobos randevu round the clock?", first appeared on seeker.com.

Be the first to suggest a tag

    Comments

    0 comments