With wind and temperatures dipping below a bitter -45 degrees Celsius, living and working in Antarctica can be a challenge — but one worth taking on for these scientists.

SeekerPublished: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018
Published: July 10, 2018Updated: July 11, 2018

In Antarctica, biologist and professor at Sonoma State University, Dr. Sean Place, can focus on doing one thing — being a scientist.

“Cell phones do not work down here. You don't have to cook for yourself. You don't shower every day because we need to conserve on water,” Place describes. “Those kind of daily activities that distract you from your goals and your focus are removed from your everyday life, and it really simplifies things for you down here. It allows me to really pursue research, which is what I was trained to do: to be a scientist. It allows me to come down here and actually go after questions that I can't ask anywhere else in the world.”

The questions that Place and his team have been asking center around labeling and tracking the life of proteins in fish. Overall, his team is eager to determine how much energy is being used as the species tries to adapt and respond to changing environmental factors, such as ocean temperatures and pH levels.

“They actually make up about 90% of the fish biomass down here and if they start to struggle, then the food chain that is reliant upon them is also going to start to struggle as well,” says Place. “It may help us get some sort of insight into how these populations are going to handle change, and whether or not we should be concerned about any of these fishery species, and start to manage them differently.”

This video, "With wind and temperatures dipping below a bitter -45 degrees Celsius, living and working in Antarctica can be a challenge — but one worth taking on for these scientists.", first appeared on seeker.com.

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