Much of the world’s construction is reliant on sand, and we’re running out of it. Here’s what that could mean.

SeekerPublished: July 10, 2018
Published: July 10, 2018

For most of us, the limit of our experience with sand is at the beach. We maybe make a castle out of it, it clings to things, and then we go home. Few of us stop to think about the role sand plays in our daily lives.

Sand is used to make glass, electronics, and in fracking. Huge quantities of sand have been dumped into the sea to reclaim land for development while other cities need it to shore up islands against rising sea levels, but it’s mostly used in construction.

Sand is the remains of pulverized and weathered rock mixed with shell fragments and other bits and pieces washed up and left as sediment from a body of water.  So, sand is unique to where you find it; its composition depends on the rocks and minerals in that part of the world, some of which are sturdier and last longer than others.

This means with populations rising, sand is quickly becoming a hot commodity because, not all sand is created equal. The fine-grained sand of the Sahara, for example, does not make an appropriate building material.  Instead, coarser sand must be mined, usually from the banks of local rivers and coastlines, and this brings a whole host of environmental and human problems. However, this also makes for a valuable export. You’d think sand is everywhere, but it’s not. This video, " Much of the world’s construction is reliant on sand, and we’re running out of it. Here’s what that could mean. ", first appeared on seeker.com.

Be the first to suggest a tag

    Comments

    0 comments