RecyclingOT's Videos

Smart geese know how to cross the street1m41s

Smart geese know how to cross the street

Why did the flock of geese cross the street? So that they can be caught on video and become Internet sensation! These very clever geese wait for the traffic light to change before crossing the street in front of the Isabella Gardner Museum in Boston. Such model citizens! Soon enough, one by one they start crossing and the cars stop for these feathery pedestrians! They look like the Beatles on that cross walk, only without the flair pants. If you are wondering why they didn’t just fly across, here’s an idea. Walking uses far less energy than flying. Conserving energy for fleeing danger and long migrations helps them survive. Geese tend to walk to their feeding site from water. Since geese are grazing animals, they will do more walking than flying. Still, it is one amazing sight to behold!

RecyclingOT
Published: May 29, 2017Updated: June 2, 2017163,495 views
Hippotherapy with Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders 4m29s

Hippotherapy with Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders

Hippotherapy involves using the horse as a treatment tool. It is used by occupational, physical and speech therapists to develop motor, cognitive, communication, social and many other skills. The movement of the horse and the emotional bond that riders develop help children and adults with disabilities to focus, decrease touch sensitivities and use their hands to develop fine-motor skills. Learn more at RecyclingOT.com

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Published: June 9, 2017Updated: June 12, 2017179 views
How to Make an Activity Book for Somebody with Alzheimer's Disease 5m29s

How to Make an Activity Book for Somebody with Alzheimer's Disease

As an occupational therapist I made many meaningful activity for my mother to use when she developed Alzheimer's Disease. In this video I describe how to fill a binder with personalized stories, photographs, pictures and song lyrics. My mother enjoyed reading this all day long! Please visit my website to download photos and lyrics that you can use to make your own activity book for someone you love or care for who has memory impairment. RecyclingOT.com

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Published: June 5, 2017Updated: June 6, 201799 viewsVirality: 4%
Help children with autism build hand skills with slap bracelets4m36s

Help children with autism build hand skills with slap bracelets

This video demonstrates how to cut fruit shapes out of plastic bottles to make fine motor activities for children or adults with autism or other developmental disabilities, as well as typically developing children. Connecting and separating the bracelets from the plastic is a fun sensory experience and develops eye-hand coordination.

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Published: May 31, 2017Updated: June 2, 2017818 views
Sensory Processing Activity: Pushing Objects between Elastics on Container 2m09s

Sensory Processing Activity: Pushing Objects between Elastics on Container

Children with sensory processing disorders, autism or other types of developmental disabilities often best engage when activities are "resistive". This means that force is required to push, pull or squeeze objects or the materials are weighted. Resistive materials stimulate muscles and joints and help develop body awareness. I adapted this simple insertion activity to require pushing objects between the elastics threaded through holes around the rim of the container BOTTOM. I use the bottom as the top because then I can unscrew the cover to remove objects later. This activity is great for very young children (as long as you supervise closely) to develop eye-hand coordination and strong fingers. Older children and adults with disabilities will also enjoy this unique sensory experience!

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Published: June 21, 2017Updated: June 22, 2017122 views
Sensory Pull Activity for Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders 6m34s

Sensory Pull Activity for Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders

Children or adults with autism and/or sensory processing disorders often love the sensory feedback provided by pulling. This video demonstrates how to make a "Sensory Pull" activity that motivates children to visually attend as they develop postural control and strengthen their hands while receiving the type of sensory stimulation they seek and love.

RecyclingOT
Published: June 3, 2017Updated: June 5, 2017125 viewsVirality: 11%
Paint Roller Ring Stack for Children with Autism 1m59s

Paint Roller Ring Stack for Children with Autism

Individuals with autism and/or sensory processing disorders may find it challenging to engage in hand activities. The "paint roller ring stack" is fun, often motivating people because it meets their sensory needs while developing eye hand coordination and visual attention. It is made by wedging a paint roller handle inside a bottle; then secure in place with duct tape. As you see in the videos, it can be used in a variety of ways to meet the different needs of individuals. Please visit my website RecyclingOT.com for information about my books, CEU courses and blog.

RecyclingOT
Published: June 2, 2017Updated: June 5, 2017159 views
Sensory Visual Perception Writing Activity 3m41s

Sensory Visual Perception Writing Activity

This activity teaches children the spatial relationships between small and large letters and how they fit on writing lines. Practice this activity with children before offering paper and pencil. Pulling the shapes off the Velcro "lines" and wiping them clean requires using force and force provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints. Learn about other easy to make and effective adaptions that help children and adults on the autism spectrum or with other developmental disabilities at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

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Published: September 2, 2017Updated: September 5, 2017211 viewsVirality: 6%
How Vibration Helps Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders 3m37s

How Vibration Helps Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders

Children with or without disabilities often love vibration! Vibration stimulates the muscles and joints and this, in turn, helps develop body awareness and coordination. The sound and feel of the motor often motivates individuals with autism or sensory processing disorders to grasp and manipulate objects such as ring stacks or stringing even though they typically avoid using their hands. I adapt many activities to vibrate when I work as an occupational therapist with both children and adults with developmental disabilities. This video demonstrates just a few of my creations. There are many more strategies in my book From Flapping to Function: A Parent's Guide to Autism and Hand Skills. Learn more at RecyclingOT.com

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Published: June 23, 2017Updated: June 27, 2017172 viewsVirality: 11%
How to make this helpful toy for children with autism1m40s

How to make this helpful toy for children with autism

This "curvy ring stack" is made out of a bird mister found at a yard sale. Clients with autism or other developmental disabilities enjoy the visual stimulation experienced when watching the rings spiral downward. They need to reach, pay visual attention and use their hands together as they develop eye-hand coordination.

RecyclingOT
Published: July 21, 2017Updated: July 24, 20174,698 viewsVirality: 7%
How to Teach Zipping Skills 1m49s

How to Teach Zipping Skills

Many children with or without disabilities find connecting a zipper to be tricky! This video demonstrates a few fun adaptations that develop the bilateral coordination to open and close zippers. It usually helps to attach something like a pipe cleaner or toy to the zipper slider so that it is easier to grasp while pulling. When I teach hand skills to children or adults with disabilities, I always make sure there is a lot of REPETITION. The young man in the video is learning how to zip his own jacket for the first time in his life because he practiced attaching 5 zipper sliders every day for several months. A different client loves to insert objects into containers so I created a task where he needed to close the zippers before inserting them. I put a motorized toothbrush and some bells inside the container to add some sensory stimulation. Let me repeat…..repetition and adding some sensory stimulation help motivate my clients to engage in some challenging hand activities.

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Published: July 7, 2017Updated: July 10, 2017253 viewsVirality: 8%
"Sensory Rings" Help Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders 3m06s

"Sensory Rings" Help Children with Autism or Sensory Processing Disorders

Children with autism, sensory processing disorders or other types of developmental disabilities often find heavy pressure from using heavy or tight squeezing materials calming. They may seek this type of sensation by crashing into cushions or people! This video shows how to make "sensory rings" out of socks and supermarket bags. They are virtually free and quick to make. Moving the rings over the body develops body awareness and coordination while meeting the child's sensory needs. Learn more at RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: June 29, 2017Updated: June 30, 201723 views
Word Completions for People with Memory Impairments6m37s

Word Completions for People with Memory Impairments

When my mom developed Alzheimer's disease she gradually lost the ability to think of the words she wanted to say. She had always loved word games and singing. So I made up games that required her to complete a word, phrase or sentence. Because the phrases were so familiar, they jogged her memory. We did this over and over again during my nursing home visits and each time was fun and exciting for her. She felt like a winner! I describe many of these games and activities in my book- Still Giving Kisses: A Guide to Helping and Enjoying the Alzheimer's Victim You Love. I didn't have a smart phone or tablet a decade ago when I needed them. But you can share this video with a loved one, friend or patient. Encourage the person to guess or repeat the word that completes the phrase. Press pause if they need time to respond. It will give caregivers a fun activity to do with a loved one at home or while visiting in a care facility. Please read my book and visit my web site for more fun activity ideas athttp://www.RecyclingOT.com

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Published: October 8, 2017Updated: October 9, 201752 viewsVirality: 17%
Stretchy, Weighted Sock Activity for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders 2m44s

Stretchy, Weighted Sock Activity for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

Children and adults with autism, sensory processing disorders or other disabilities often enjoy the sensory stimulation provided by weighted materials and activities that involve pushing or pulling. I filled some long stretchy socks with bags of sand and attached handles to each end. You may also use stretchy sleeves or pant legs from clothing instead of socks or tights. Cut some handles from detergent bottles and attach to the stretchy heavy material and see how much fun they have! I have used this with clients to motivate reaching, grasping, shaking, pulling and other movements. Some clients find this calming and it may decrease agitation. This activity can be incorporated into sensory motor games such as... Players hold an end while others run under or step over the "Sensory Socks". Try it, it's fun!

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Published: June 17, 2017Updated: June 19, 2017117 views
PUlling Objects Out of Sensory Socks 1m55s

PUlling Objects Out of Sensory Socks

The young man in this video typically does not like to use his hands together to stabilize materials. His attention span is very short and after a few repetitions he usually throws or pushes objects away. I knew that he liked deep pressure and his eyes lit up when he felt his arm inside the tight sock as he removed objects. I am sure that he would do even better if there were an electric toothbrush attached to the bottom. However, I am very proud of him for telling me that he wanted "more" and attending for over a minute.... More sensory strategies at http://www.recyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: November 2, 2017Updated: November 6, 2017141 views
Sensory Processing Disorder Activity: Stringing Coiled Hose 1m58s

Sensory Processing Disorder Activity: Stringing Coiled Hose

Children and adults with autism, sensory processing disorder and other developmental disabilities often seek out sensory stimulation to the eyes, muscles and joints. This unique stringing adaptation provides exactly this type of stimulation and its FUN! Simply take a coil type water hose and cut it to the desired length. Attach a sock or something to the bottom so that the user can stand on it, preventing the bottom from popping upward. This activity is great for developing balance, visual engagement and bilateral hand use (using hands together). Use rings that attach shower curtains, arts and crafts rings or cut your own out of plastic bottles. My clients love the sensation of pulling the coil upward and watching the rings spin downward. Learn more about adapting activities on my web site www.RecyclingOT.com and thank-you to Ben at www.Bensound.com for the lively music.

RecyclingOT
Published: August 18, 2017Updated: August 21, 201792 views
Sensory Pegboard for Children with Autism and other Developmental Disabilities 5m04s

Sensory Pegboard for Children with Autism and other Developmental Disabilities

My "sensory pegboard" is easy to use because the "pegs" are actually bottles, large and easy to grasp and insert into the large holes. These "pegs" do not easily fall out! This helps children with decreased motor control. But the best part is the sensory stimulation provided by the weight of the water bottles, looking at colorful objects moving inside the bottle, the vibration and the music. These types of sensory-based adaptations help children and adults with developmental disabilities to engage and develop hand skills. Learn more at RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: July 11, 2017Updated: July 12, 2017131 viewsVirality: 55%
Improving Function with Adapted handles 2m24s

Improving Function with Adapted handles

People with spasticity may have difficulty grasping or stabilizing objects. This video demonstrates how to adapt with handles cut out of detergent, dishwasher or other bottles. The handles can be attached to activities such as ring stacks, sorting containers or shape sorters using Velcro or tape. This adaptation enabled the little girl in the pink sweater to grasp the green handle attached to the coffee can while inserting picture cards. At the same time her little hand is opened up instead of fisted, helping to maintain her range-of-motion. Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

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Published: November 4, 2017Updated: November 6, 201745 views
Weavable Toys Develop Fine-Motor Skills for autistic children 2m20s

Weavable Toys Develop Fine-Motor Skills for autistic children

Kids love manipulatives!! Make your own plastic shapes and frames to weave by cutting up plastic containers or purchase Weavable toys on my website RecyclingOT.com. Weaving develops eye-hand coordination and bending the plastic strengthens fingers. Design your own toys for endless possibilities! These toys are designed for children and adults with or without disabilities. It is easier to teach how to pull the shapes off the frame or remove from a long cord.... so first teach this skill to people with greater challenges. Increase challenge by using more complex shapes, smaller shapes, thinner cord and smaller notches to weave into or stiffer plastic. Learn more at: www.barbarasmithoccupationaltherapist.com/weavabletoys.html

RecyclingOT
Published: August 5, 2017Updated: August 7, 201755 views
Ring Stack Color Matching Activity1m35s

Ring Stack Color Matching Activity

Many children and adults with developmental disabilities including autism spectrum disorders enjoy repetitive hand activities. The client shown in the video is very active and easily distracted. By adapting the activity to involve movement to retrieve rings she becomes more focused and completes the task. I use flat ring shapes cut out of detergent bottles instead of beads because they will not roll away and many more will fit on the dowels. Learn about activity adaptions on my web site: http://www.recyclingot.com

RecyclingOT
Published: October 24, 2017Updated: October 25, 201732 views
Sensory Pull Bottle Helps Children with Autism or sensory Processing Disorders 2m39s

Sensory Pull Bottle Helps Children with Autism or sensory Processing Disorders

The "sensory pull bottle" is a fun way to help young children develop hand strength, coordination between right and left hands and to develop a hand preference. I incorporate this activity when working with children with developmental disabilities such as autism spectrum disorders, sensory processing disorders or other impairments that impact developing hand skills. It can be used while the child is sitting, kneeling, standing, riding a horse or moving in other ways. The combination of movement, pulling and vibration helps to motivate and engage children.

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Published: June 13, 2017Updated: June 14, 2017146 viewsVirality: 27%
Make Your Own Apple Toys for Preschoolers2m58s

Make Your Own Apple Toys for Preschoolers

This video demonstrates 3 different apple fine motor activities made out of plastic bottles. Bending and lacing plastic apples strengthens fingers and develops eye-hand coordination. Inserting or removing worms from apples is great pretend play and pushing the circles down hard to decorate the big apple develops the motor control needed to grasp a pencil. These activities are fun and help both typically developing children and children with challenges such as autism to build hand skills. Learn more in my books and website at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: September 29, 2017Updated: October 3, 201720 views
Make-Your-Own Buckle Manipulation Toys 2m50s

Make-Your-Own Buckle Manipulation Toys

Parents, therapists and teachers.... cut up your round containers to make toy buckles. Pushing the tab in and out of the notches develops strong fingers and eye-hand coordination. Use super large food containers for large rings and smaller shampoo bottles for smaller rings. Children can choose to buckle, pull rings open, toss them onto a ring stack or even string them on big strips of fabric. This activity is especially beneficial for children or adults with fine motor challenges who may struggle to close a belt. Make-Your-own buckles are easier than using real belt buckles and there is opportunity for REPETITION! Learn more about activity adaptations at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: November 18, 2017Updated: November 20, 201736 views
Fun Activities that Develop Buttoning Skills 4m00s

Fun Activities that Develop Buttoning Skills

Children with sensory processing disorders or developmental disabilities such as autism- may find it challenging to learn how to open and close buttons. The adaptations shown in this video are designed to make learning easier by using large materials and repetition. So parents, teachers and therapists consider making "button squares", "button stringing", "button rings" and "button boards" to develop these hand skills. Learn more on my website at RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: July 3, 2017Updated: July 5, 2017123 viewsVirality: 38%