RecyclingOT's Videos

Velcro Fine-Motor Task  for Individuals with  Developmental  Disabilities 1m27s

Velcro Fine-Motor Task for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

Ripping Velcro off backings is fun for children and adults! Pulling provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints and many people enjoy the ripping sound. The client in the video is blind , so the auditory and proprioceptive input helps him focus as he sequences the steps of 1) ripping the shapes off the board and 2) inserting them into the container. Students or clients with vision might enjoy identifying pictures before ripping them off the board. Some may be able to identify the shapes. It has been challenging to find a repetitive task that this individual can perform independently, I think I found a winner….. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Deep Pressure Sensory  Processing  Activity: Pulling Rings off Cord Inside Sock 1m46s

Deep Pressure Sensory Processing Activity: Pulling Rings off Cord Inside Sock

Pulling objects out of a tight sock provides deep pressure sensory stimulation to skin, muscles and joints. This activity adaptation adds the complexity of pulling the rings off of the cord that is attached inside the long sock. This client is visually impaired and frequently seeks sensory stimulation by shaking her head. I think that she enjoys this type of repetitive sensory-based activity that offers a greater challenge that simply inserting objects into an opening. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Stringing Sensory  Shapes  for Individuals  with Autism 1m15s

Stringing Sensory Shapes for Individuals with Autism

This activity combines stringing with fitting shapes into a container opening. Use thicker cord or make the lid opening smaller to increase the amount of force required. Using force to pull and push provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints. Many children or adults with sensory processing disorders and/or autism may be motivated to engage in this type of sensory-based adaptation. Explore inserting a motorized toothbrush into the container for addition stimulation! The client shown in this video typically avoids using his hands together but loves simple insertion tasks. The combination of stringing and insertion is very motivating for him. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make A  Sensory Activity  out of a Phone  Charger Coil 2m04s

How to Make A Sensory Activity out of a Phone Charger Coil

Recycle those broken phone chargers or buy a cheap one from a Dollar Store to make this great sensory stimulation fine-motor activity. Suitable for young children with or without disabilities or adults who enjoy repetitive hand tasks; this activity develops skills to: 1) Use hands together 2) Eye-Hand coordination 3) Manipulate screw covers 4) Color matching In addition, this activity helps children discover which hand they prefer using. Notice which hand seems stronger or better coordinated while grasping the handle with one hand and pulling with the other and then reversing hands used. Ask your child or student which feels better. Pulling the shapes on or off the coils requires force and force builds strength while stimulating the muscles and joints. Many of my clients find this calming. Give it a try! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Looping Craft: Team Work 1m08s

Looping Craft: Team Work

Both of these adults with developmental disabilities have behavioral challenges and love to earn token rewards at their day program. They can easily become frustrated and agitated but were highly motivated to work together to sequence adding loops to a long chain. I provided verbal directions and actually started to sing them and after about 10 minutes they were able to work with only supervision. One client has the motor planning skills to form and sequence the loops and the other client has he skills to pull the long strand -keeping the materials taut and untangled. I love team work! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

How to Make  "Spring Rings" for  Fine-Motor  Activities 1m50s

How to Make "Spring Rings" for Fine-Motor Activities

Children and adults with autism and/or other types of developmental disabilities will be motivated to pull these home-made “spring rings” as they stretch them over a ring stack or pull them off objects (i.e. ring stacks or suspended cord) to insert into container openings. Pulling on these springy spirals is fun to watch and stimulates the skin, joints and muscles in the process. Manipulating these rings promotes using hands together and motor planning skills. Children with or without disabilities will enjoy all this sensory stimulation and children who avoid touching objects may find them irresistible! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Simple Pull Activity  for Sensory Processing  Disorders 2m30s

Simple Pull Activity for Sensory Processing Disorders

Individuals with sensory processing disorders (SPD) often have decreased hand strength, avoid using their hands together and have poor coordination. This describes many children and adults on the autism spectrum or who have another type of disability. This simple activity encourages using hands together because it is really difficult to perform with one hand! Many people with SPD avoid touching different types of materials but don’t mind plastic. It takes a lot of force to pull these plastic rings off the cord and pulling with force stimulates muscles and joints while strengthening muscles. Adapt for your child or individual: 1) Use rings with larger or smaller holes in the center depending so that they are successful. You can always use rings with smaller holes later as they get stronger. 2) Some of my clients prefer to stand and pace while performing this (See in the video how I tied the cord around my waist while the client pulled the rings off). Other clients prefer sitting at a table or in a chair away from the table. 3) Pulling the rings off takes less motor planning skill and coordination than stringing them on. But some children or clients may be able to or prefer to string. 4) Ring shapes are easier to grasp and manipulate than beads and they don’t roll away. But you may certainly progress onto using large and then smaller beads. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://. www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com