RecyclingOT's Videos

Matching Numbers Screw Cap Activity to Develop Fine- Motor Skills2m54s

Matching Numbers Screw Cap Activity to Develop Fine- Motor Skills

Children or adults with developmental disabilities may enjoy matching as they screw bottle caps onto the corresponding size threaded pieces. Write numbers, letters or glue pictures to caps and threaded pieces to make matching fun! Materials needed: 1)Threaded pieces cut from plastic bottles 2) Caps or covers that screw onto the threaded pieces 3)A long strip of fabric 4) A container to insert the lids into (optional) Cut 2 holes in each threaded piece in order to string them onto the cord. You will see in the video that some clients preferred to sit. However, I adapted the materials to encourage reaching or standing. Some clients not only enjoy standing, they crave movement and this activity enables them to retrieve materials located on the floor or across the room. Screwing or unscrewing the lids strengthens hands and develops bilateral hand coordination. Making this activity costs virtually ZERO $$$$ Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Pop Tube Activity for Individuals with  Autism 1m32s

Sensory Pop Tube Activity for Individuals with Autism

A large detergent bottle has a "Sensory Pop Tube" attached to one opening to push/pull rings down. Use shower rings or cut plastic bottles into donut shapes. These are not only free, but also vibrant and won’t break easily. Curly strips are inserted into the other opening. This video demonstrates how to make them: Https://rumble.com/v6l3fv-curly-insertions-develop-motor-planning-skills.html Cut a secret opening on the bottom of the bottle to remove the curly strips. This activity develops the visual perceptual skills to choose whether the plastic pieces either need to be pushed down the tube or inserted into the opening. While developing eye hand coordination, the child or adult with autism or other types of developmental delays will enjoy using force on these materials and the sound of the rings going down the pop tube. Using force stimulates the muscles, joints and tendons helping individuals with sensory processing disorders develop body awareness and motor coordination. Increase the motor planning challenge by twisting the pop tube to bend in different directions! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Baby Tray Sensory  Activity for  Children with  Autism 1m50s

Baby Tray Sensory Activity for Children with Autism

Children and adults with autism or other types of developmental disabilities often benefit from pulling sensory activities that stimulate the muscles, joints and tendons. The video demonstrates pulling colorful shapes off of curly plastic strips attached to a tray. I drilled holes in the tray (actually a wonderful maintenance man at work did) to push the strips through and attach on the bottom of the tray. The following video demonstrates how to make the curly strips by cutting around bottles: https://rumble.com/v6l3fv-curly-insertions-develop-motor-planning-skills.html The last step is to cut a notch in the shapes for stringing or removing. Some children will be able to string while matching by color, shape or objects (in this case, apples, bananas and grapes). Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Walking and Sensory Stimulation! 59s

Walking and Sensory Stimulation!

Walking is great exercise that also provides vestibular sensory stimulation that impacts balance and body awareness. Many of my clients are sedentary, obese and/or have limited physical endurance. The program hallways are designed for walking groups. However, there is not always enough staff to provide supervision and many clients refuse to participate. Therefore, I find it helpful to create simple movement activities that involve walking across the room and/or moving materials at different heights. Staff can gradually increase endurance, by providing more materials to transfer. Although functional activities such as putting away groceries or recreational pastimes such as walking in a park are ideal forms of exercise, clients who enjoy repetitive tasks in the program or classroom, benefit when activities are adapted to involve walking. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Window Rings: for  Reaching,  Crossing  midline and Trunk  Rotation 2m02s

Window Rings: for Reaching, Crossing midline and Trunk Rotation

These "rings" are cut from round containers and are open-ended so that they can be attached to or pulled off suspended cord or a tube. Many of my clients are sedentary and this is a great way to encourage standing, reaching, crossing midline, trunk rotation and if possible walking from one part of the room to another to retrieve more materials. Notice that I used a lot of verbal cues with one client and nonverbal cues with the other. We all learn and follow directions in different ways! Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Sensory Activities  Using Magnetic  White Board 1m48s

Sensory Activities Using Magnetic White Board

Using vertical surfaces has always been a popular occupational therapy strategy used in school systems and pediatric clinics. I work with adults with developmental disabilities who continue to benefit from vertical plane activities. I notice that in many of the program rooms these fantastic therapeutic materials (AKA white boards) are filled with schedules, photographs and organized to be attractive as well as functional. However I believe that whiteboards can be functional, therapeutic and as well as beautiful! This video demonstrates just one of many simple therapeutic activities that uses 3 common materials: Magnetic white boards, dry erase markers and magnets. Benefits of this activity for young children and/or adults with developmental disabilities include: 1) Visual attention is easier when materials are right in front of the face 2) Standing, reaching high/low and moving back and forth between magnet container and white board is more aerobic than sitting and movement provides sensory stimulation. Unfortunately, many of my clients who are obese and sedentary may find this activity an endurance challenge. 3)Students or clients developing social skills as they work together to perform one of the 3 main steps (i.e. drawing circles, placing or removing magnets and cleaning the board) 4) Learning to clean the board helps them to improve similar motor and daily living skills such as wiping tables or drying trays. 5)This activity encourages using both side of the body at the same time. My client in the wheelchair who had a brain injury avoids using hands together and crossing midline. This activity was fun and fairly simple so he was willing to use one hand to control the wheelchair and the other hand to do the task. 6) This activity can be easily adapted to work on cognitive skills such as color matching, picture identification or counting. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Curly Insertions  Develop Motor  Planning Skills 1m31s

Curly Insertions Develop Motor Planning Skills

These "curly insertion strips" are cut out of round containers. They add a little pizzazz and challenge to ordinary insertion tasks as children or adults with developmental disabilities manipulate them. This activity promotes 1) using two hands together 2) visual attention when materials are raised to eye level 3)sequencing skills when the strips are pulled off a cord and then inserted 4) sensory stimulation when pulling or pushing to remove or insert the strips Adapt the activity according to the person's needs. Insertion openings may be larger or smaller than the ones shown here. The curly strips may be longer or shorter. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com

Fabric Ring Stack for  Children with Sensory  Processing Disorders 1m15s

Fabric Ring Stack for Children with Sensory Processing Disorders

Children or adults with sensory processing disorders might enjoy pushing pieces of fabric on or pulling them off a simple homemade stack. Simply wedge a sturdy tube inside a detergent bottle. Secure with duct tape. The bottle handle provides an enlarged, comfortable grasping handle that encourages them to stabilize materials. Individuals with autism and others with sensory processing disorders benefit from the force used to pull or push the fabric on or off the tube. Use varied fabric textures to develop tactile discrimination skills. It is often easier for children with attention challenges to visually engage on what they are doing when the materials are straight in front of their eyes. Learn more about activity adaptations on my website and blog: http://www.RecyclingOT.com http://www.RecyclingOT.blogspot.com