RecyclingOT's Videos

Binder Geoboard to Develop Fine-Motor Skills 3m11s

Binder Geoboard to Develop Fine-Motor Skills

Purchase a geoboard or make your own using 2 old book binders, contact paper and elastics. Occupational therapists love using these because they help children or adults with developmental or learning disabilities to strengthen their hands and improve eye-hand coordination. Stretching the elastics provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints that may help individuals on the autism spectrum to focus and learn. Attaching the board to a raised or angled surface may help children better visually attend to the activity because the board is right in front of the person's face. Try experimenting with color matching or copying designs from a picture or model. Learn more about activity adaptations at www.RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: September 8, 2017Updated: September 12, 201713 views
Sensory Visual Perception Writing Activity 3m41s

Sensory Visual Perception Writing Activity

This activity teaches children the spatial relationships between small and large letters and how they fit on writing lines. Practice this activity with children before offering paper and pencil. Pulling the shapes off the Velcro "lines" and wiping them clean requires using force and force provides sensory stimulation to muscles and joints. Learn about other easy to make and effective adaptions that help children and adults on the autism spectrum or with other developmental disabilities at http://www.RecyclingOT.com

RecyclingOT
Published: September 2, 2017Updated: September 5, 201757 viewsVirality: 18%
Sensory Processing Disorder Activity: Stringing Coiled Hose 1m58s

Sensory Processing Disorder Activity: Stringing Coiled Hose

Children and adults with autism, sensory processing disorder and other developmental disabilities often seek out sensory stimulation to the eyes, muscles and joints. This unique stringing adaptation provides exactly this type of stimulation and its FUN! Simply take a coil type water hose and cut it to the desired length. Attach a sock or something to the bottom so that the user can stand on it, preventing the bottom from popping upward. This activity is great for developing balance, visual engagement and bilateral hand use (using hands together). Use rings that attach shower curtains, arts and crafts rings or cut your own out of plastic bottles. My clients love the sensation of pulling the coil upward and watching the rings spin downward. Learn more about adapting activities on my web site www.RecyclingOT.com and thank-you to Ben at www.Bensound.com for the lively music.

RecyclingOT
Published: August 18, 2017Updated: August 21, 201729 views