EcuadorMegadiverso's Videos

Leggy Pinocchio Weevil from Ecuador1m05s

Leggy Pinocchio Weevil from Ecuador

True Weevils, also called snout beetles or Curculionidae are one of the largest animal families with over 80,000 species described worldwide. They feed on plants with their long snout (rostrum), in many cases only living on a single species. This cute little fellow of the genus Cholus was filmed in the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador

Not a Jelly Baby but a Jewel Caterpillar from Ecuador56s

Not a Jelly Baby but a Jewel Caterpillar from Ecuador

What looks like a tasty gummy sweet is actually a Translucent Jewel Caterpillar from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. It belongs to a family of moths known as Dalceridae whose larvae are also called slug caterpillars. They are not poisonous as many other caterpillars, but the yellow glutinous cones will just break off if a predator wants to grab them. Also their stickiness may protect them from being eaten by hungry insects such as ants.

Cute little Jumping Spider with Boxing Gloves from Ecuador1m31s

Cute little Jumping Spider with Boxing Gloves from Ecuador

Jumping spiders, Salticidae are the largest family of spiders. This little guy was filmed in the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. Its pedipalps end in two bulbs which look like a pair of boxing gloves but are actually the male genitalia. Jumping spider do not build a web to trap insects, but jump on their prey and grab it with the jaws. Jumping spiders still produce silk for safety lines as can be seen at 20" in the video and also to build a tent as shelter from bad weather and to sleep at night. As most spiders they have four pairs of eyes, which give them a 360-degree view of the world. Their large frontal eyes are build like telescopes and provide them with very sharp vision. A mobile retina allows them to scan the object they are looking at.

Cute little Jumping spider from Ecuador1m14s

Cute little Jumping spider from Ecuador

Jumping spiders, Salticidae are the largest family of spiders. This little Phiale sp. was filmed in the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. They do not build a web to trap insects, but jump on their prey and grab it with the jaws. Jumping spiders still produce silk for safety lines while jumping and also to build a tent as shelter from bad weather and to sleep at night. As most spiders they have four pairs of eyes, which give them a 360-degree view of the world. Their large frontal eyes are build like telescopes and provide them with very sharp vision. A mobile retina allows them to scan the object they are looking at.

Tiny treehopper from Ecuador54s

Tiny treehopper from Ecuador

This treehopper from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador is called Entylia carinata in the family Membracidae and measures only 5 mm in length. Treehoppers are insects related to cicadas and leafhoppers. Most treehoppers have a highly modified pronotum on the back. Treehoppers feed on plant sap which is rich in sugar.

Ant-mimicking treehopper from Ecuador2m11s

Ant-mimicking treehopper from Ecuador

This treehopper from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador is called Cyphonia clavata in the family Membracidae and measures only 6 mm in length. Treehoppers are insects related to cicadas and leafhoppers. Most treehoppers have a highly modified pronotum on the back, in this case forming several hollow spheres and spines, which makes it unpalatable for potential predators. Moreover it resembles an ant which most predators rather avoid. Treehoppers feed on plant sap which is rich in sugar. In this video the sucking mouthparts of the treehopper have penetrated the vein of a leaf.

Lady Beetle Larva from Ecuador59s

Lady Beetle Larva from Ecuador

This larva of a Lady Beetle, Coccinellidae, Azyini or Coccidulini? was filmed in the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. The coating of white tufts consists of waxy secretions that presumably protect the larva from predators by making it difficult to seize or just unpalatable.

Green Jumper Crosses Eyes as it sees its Mirror Image1m17s

Green Jumper Crosses Eyes as it sees its Mirror Image

This little Green Jumping Spider named Lyssomanes lives in the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. Jumping spiders, Salticidae are the largest family of spiders. They do not build a web to trap insects, but jump on their prey and grab it with the jaws. Jumping spiders still produce silk for safety lines while jumping and also to build a tent as shelter from bad weather and to sleep at night. As most spiders they have four pairs of eyes, which give them a 360-degree view of the world. Their large frontal eyes are build like telescopes and provide them with very sharp vision. A mobile retina allows them to scan the object they are looking at, which is why the frontal eyes turn black as the retina gets into focus.

Bunny Harvestman preparing for a new day2m50s

Bunny Harvestman preparing for a new day

Here is another video of the Bunny Harvestman from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. Its scientific name is Metagryne bicolumnata, from the family of Cosmetidae, in the order of Opiliones, also known as Harvestmen or daddy longlegs. They are not spiders, but belong to the same class of Arachnida. Contrary to a common belief Harvestmen do not have venom glands and are absolutely harmless. Harvestmen have been around for at least 400 million years and lived even before the dinosaurs. watch my previous video of the Bunny Harvestman: https://rumble.com/v44zn5

Leafcutter ants hard at work in Amazon rainforest2m15s

Leafcutter ants hard at work in Amazon rainforest

These leafcutter ants from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador dissect a leaf with their strong mandibles and carry the pieces to their colony's fungus garden under ground. They cannot digest the leaves themselves but cultivate a special fungus on which they feed. The wingless worker ants are females. Each ant can carry up to 50 times its own body weight. This is equivalent to a man carrying a van over his head!

Red Postman Butterfly shows off stunning colors in rainforest1m53s

Red Postman Butterfly shows off stunning colors in rainforest

This is a subspecies of the Red Postman butterfly from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. Its bright colors warn predators such as birds that it is unpalatable. There are close to 4,000 species of butterflies and some 10,000 moths in Ecuador, one of the countries with the highest biodiversity on earth!

Arm-waving jumping spider is beautifully colorful1m05s

Arm-waving jumping spider is beautifully colorful

This video shows a little Jumping Spider from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. They do not build a web to trap insects, but jump on their prey and grab it with the jaws. Jumping spiders still produce silk for safety lines while jumping and also to build a tent as shelter from bad weather and to sleep at night. As most spiders they have four pairs of eyes, which give them a 360-degree view of the world. Their large frontal eyes are build like telescopes and provide them with very sharp vision. A mobile retina allows them to scan the object they are looking at.

Hairstreak butterfly fools predators with fake head45s

Hairstreak butterfly fools predators with fake head

This Hairstreak butterfly from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador not only has striped legs and antennae, but also a false head with orange and black fake eyes and tails that mimic antennae. This creates the illusion that the back is actually the front. Predators, such as birds and jumping spiders, will aim for the hairstreak's tail, rather than its head, and the butterfly may escape in the opposite direction.

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"Zombie" ant victim of killer fungus

This carpenter ant from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador became infected with a fungus that forces the ant to climb up and bite down on the underside of a leaf. Then it slowly decomposes the ant and grows a spore-releasing stalk from its head in order to infect more ants. Such Entomopathogenic Fungi attack many other insects and may be employed as biological insecticides. Crazy!

Beautiful ruby gold target tortoise beetle from Ecuador55s

Beautiful ruby gold target tortoise beetle from Ecuador

Tortoise beetles own their name to the carapace under which they can find shelter like a tortoise, with the difference that their carapace can open for flight. This species with a ruby ring on gold ground that looks like a target is from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador.

Rainforest jumping spider feasts on long-legged fly1m59s

Rainforest jumping spider feasts on long-legged fly

This video shows a tiny jumping spider from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador feeding on a long-legged fly. Jumping spiders do not build a web to trap insects, but jump on their prey and grab it with the jaws. Jumping spiders still produce silk for safety lines while jumping and also to build a tent as shelter from bad weather and to sleep at night. As most spiders they have four pairs of eyes, which give them a 360-degree view of the world. Their large frontal eyes are build like telescopes and provide them with very sharp vision. A mobile retina allows them to scan the object they are looking at.

Jumping spider from Ecuador at breakfast2m14s

Jumping spider from Ecuador at breakfast

Jumping spiders, Salticidae are the largest family of spiders. They do not build a web to trap insects, but jump on their prey and grab it with the jaws. This little fellow from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador was filmed shortly after it had caught a fly. Jumping spiders still produce silk for safety lines while jumping and also to build a tent as shelter from bad weather and to sleep at night. As most spiders they have four pairs of eyes, which give them a 360-degree view of the world. Their large frontal eyes are build like telescopes and provide them with very sharp vision. A mobile retina allows them to scan the object they are looking at.

Bizarre rainforest insect resembles a helicopter2m19s

Bizarre rainforest insect resembles a helicopter

This is a treehopper from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. Treehoppers are insects related to cicadas and leafhoppers. Most treehoppers have a highly modified pronotum on the back, in this case forming five hairy globes and a long spine, probably serving to deter predators. Treehoppers feed on plant sap which is rich in sugar.

Crab spider mimics flower to attract prey1m33s

Crab spider mimics flower to attract prey

Flower Crab Spiders do not build webs to catch their prey. Instead, they are ambush predators. They usually sit motionless in flowers and grab visiting insects such as bees, flies or butterflies with their crab-like front legs. Some species can even change color to match the flower they are on. But this species from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador can be found on green leaves and mimics itself a flower by reflecting ultraviolet (UV) light, just as flowers do, in order to attract pollinating insects. Even its movements are jerky, like a flower swaying in the wind. It produces silk for safety lines. As most spiders it has four pairs of eyes.