Technology Videos

NASA Conducts RS-25 Rocket Engine Test8m52s

NASA Conducts RS-25 Rocket Engine Test

The 8.5-minute test conducted at NASA’s Stennis Space Center is part of a series of tests designed to put the upgraded former space shuttle engines through the rigorous temperature and pressure conditions they will experience during a launch. The tests also support the development of a new controller, or “brain,” for the engine, which monitors engine status and communicates between the rocket and the engine, relaying commands to the engine and transmitting data back to the rocket. Credit: NASA

This Week @NASA: Media View Barge Pegasus and SLS Hardware2m56s

This Week @NASA: Media View Barge Pegasus and SLS Hardware

On May 16, NASA held a media event at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, to highlight the recent arrival of the barge Pegasus with the first core stage test article for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. NASA modified Pegasus to accommodate the massive SLS core stage, increasing the barge's length and weight-carrying capacity. The core stage test article – manufactured at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility, in New Orleans – is the first of four core stage test articles scheduled to be delivered to Marshall for testing. This delivery marks a critical milestone toward Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), the first flight of SLS and NASA’s Orion spacecraft. It also brings the agency a step closer to sending humans to deep space destinations – including Mars. Also, Lightfoot Discusses Future Exploration Goals, Ochoa, Foale Inducted into Hall of Fame, and Virtual Tour of Meteorite Lab! Credit: NASA

NASA conducts first mission into sun's atmosphere2m14s

NASA conducts first mission into sun's atmosphere

The first mission designed to fly directly into the sun’s atmosphere – Solar Probe Plus has been renamed the Parker Solar Probe, in honor of University of Chicago physicist, Eugene Parker. Parker is best known for developing the concept of solar wind, which is the stream of electrically charged particles emitted by the sun. This is the first time a NASA spacecraft has been named after a living person. Targeted for launch in 2018, the mission will help answer questions about the physics of how stars work. Also, Webb Space Telescope Showcased at JSC, Space Station Crew Safely Returns to Earth, and Centennial of JFK’s Birth! Credit: NASA

NASA suborbital sounding rocket payload successfully launched1m47s

NASA suborbital sounding rocket payload successfully launched

A NASA suborbital sounding rocket carrying multiple student experiments was successfully launched at 5:30 a.m. EDT, Thursday, June 22, from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The mission carried experiments built by undergraduate students from universities and community colleges across the country through the RockOn! and RockSat-C programs. The experiments, launch on a 36-foot long Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket, flew to an altitude of 72 miles and landed, via parachute, in the Atlantic Ocean. The payload has been recovered and the students are expected to receive their experiments this afternoon to begin their data analysis. RockOn! and RockSat-C are part of Rocket Week at Wallops. Nearly 130 students and instructors participated in the two programs this week conducted in partnership with the Colorado and Virginia Space Grant Consortia. Credit: NASA

rumblestaff
Published: August 2, 2017Updated: August 3, 2017
New Crew Launches To The Space Station2m31s

New Crew Launches To The Space Station

Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot was in Kazakhstan on July 28 to observe the launch to the International Space Station of our astronaut Randy Bresnik with his crewmates – Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency. The trio is scheduled to spend more than four months on the station working on hundreds of science and technology experiments. Also, New 4K Footage of Spacewalk, NASA Technologies Showcased at AirVenture Event, Preparing to Chase the Total Solar Eclipse from the Sky, and Another Successful RS-25 Engine Test! Credit: NASA

Expedition 52-53 Crew Docks To The Space Station6m23s

Expedition 52-53 Crew Docks To The Space Station

After launching earlier in the day in their Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 Soyuz Commander Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency arrived at the International Space Station on July 28. Credit: NASA

U.S. Commercial Cargo Ship Departs Space Station For Earth3m11s

U.S. Commercial Cargo Ship Departs Space Station For Earth

The unpiloted SpaceX/Dragon cargo craft departed the International Space Station July 2 bound for a parachute-assisted splashdown in the Pacific Ocean southwest of Long Beach, California. Loaded with valuable science samples and other hardware, Dragon was robotically released by Expedition 52 Flight Engineers Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, who operated the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm from the cupola work station. The Dragon, which was launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket June 3, delivered more than three tons of scientific investigations and supplies for the station’s residents. Credit: NASA

NASA's RS-25 Rocket Engine Fires Up Again8m47s

NASA's RS-25 Rocket Engine Fires Up Again

Engineers conduct the third in a series of RS-25 flight controller tests on July 25, 2017, for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket. The more than 8 1/2 minute test on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi signaled another step toward launch of NASA’s new Space Launch System (SLS). The SLS rocket, powered by four RS-25 engines, along with the Orion spacecraft will take astronauts on a new era of exploration beyond Earth’s orbit into deep space. Credit: NASA

Juno Spacecraft Spies Jupiter’s Great Red Spot2m15s

Juno Spacecraft Spies Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

On July 10, the Juno spacecraft completed its 7th perijove – or close flyby of Jupiter. It flew directly over the planet’s iconic Great Red Spot – about 5,600 miles above it. All of the spacecraft's science instruments, and its JunoCam imager were active – providing the first up-close look at the ten-thousand-mile-wide storm that has intrigued humans for hundreds of years. Juno's next close flyby of Jupiter will occur on Sept. 1. Also, The Path Ahead for New Horizons, Orion Egress Testing, and Langley’s Centennial Symposium. Category Credit: NASA

rumblestaff
Published: July 21, 2017Updated: July 24, 20172 views
NASA EDGE: The Future of Commercial Supersonic Travel2m18s

NASA EDGE: The Future of Commercial Supersonic Travel

NASA Langley Research Center’s Peter Coen (Commercial Supersonic Technology Program Manager) and David Richwine (Quiet Supersonic Technology Project Manager) explain how advances in design could help reduce the impact of sonic booms and promote supersonic flight over land. Credit: NASA EDGE

Roll-Out Solar Array Experiment (ROSA) Deploys on International Space Station8m00s

Roll-Out Solar Array Experiment (ROSA) Deploys on International Space Station

The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) was deployed from the end of the Canadarm2 robotic arm Sunday, June 18 outside the International Space Station. ROSA is an experiment to test a new type of solar array that rolls open in space like a party favor and is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction,characterizes changes when the Earth blocks the sun, vibration and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability. ROSA has the potential to replace solar arrays on future satellites, making them more compact and lighter weight. Satellite radio and television, weather forecasting, GPS and other services used on Earth would all benefit from high-performance solar arrays. The payload will remain deployed for seven days before retracting and will be stowed back inside the trunk of SpaceX’s Dragon cargo vehicle. Note: footage of deploy is sped up 300%. NOTE: THERE IS NO AUDIO WITH THIS FOOTAGE Credit: NASA Johnson

Rocket launch highlights for ULA Delta IV Medium+1m20s

Rocket launch highlights for ULA Delta IV Medium+

Set phasers to fun as this amazing video of a rocket launching is truly something that should be seen by everyone! Rocket enthusiast and viewers alike will be captivated and transfixed watching this awesome video! This video shows a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Medium+ 5,4 rocket lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 37. The video is a mix of live shots from Cape Canaveral's Exploration Tower, as well as remote videos placed at the Cape's SLC-37. So cool! Isn't the idea of space exploration the coolest? It is all possible because of rockets like these going out of our atmosphere and documenting the universe! It is cool to think that human made objects such as these will be going to places that human kind have never been before! This is a video that space lovers should not miss! Although you can't own your own big rocket like this, you could always get a model rocket kit on Amazon to quench that need for space exploration! Or at the very least have something cool to fly around on the weekends! Did you ever want to be an astronaut growing up? Let us know in the comments below!

Incredible launch and landing of SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket2m26s

Incredible launch and landing of SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket

Space, the final frontier. As technology gets more and more advanced, you can expect to see a surge in rockets going to space. Before you know it, human civilization will begin to be able to go out into space for a trip, and even colonize other planets. Isn't that just insane? Technology just gets cooler and cooler each day! Here we have the highlights from the launch of the Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX. It was launched from the Kennedy Space Center, in its Launch Complex 39A in Florida. Watch as this rocket ascends into the sky to music. The purpose of this mission is to gather intelligence and to relay it back to the headquarters on Earth. Everyday there is a new advancement in some kind technology, and collectively, all those advancements can lead to something awesome, just like the launch of this rocket. Check out the highlights for the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A in Florida. Amazing!

Gunrunner85
Published: June 6, 2017Updated: June 7, 20171,073 views
Real-life Iron Man flies at 30mph!49s

Real-life Iron Man flies at 30mph!

We've all heard of Iron Man and his tales. Tony Stark's famous suit has become a phenomenon for fans and scientists alike. Although the movie portrayed a super suit which can fly, obviously it was all just show. That suit got engineers thinking, and it didn't take long to take action. Several people have tried to replicate the suit for real, with little success. Until now. As the suit develops and Richard's ability increases, we find him here soaring at 30mph over a 500m stretch. Richard said he might have let out an involuntary 'whoop' while turning! Gravity is a British human propulsion technology start-up with a mission to re-imagine the future of manned flight. Epic! Would you ever give this a go? The future is here, and this suit can only get more and more realistic as time goes on. From dream, to a reality! How awesome is that? Check out this real-life Iron Man!

What does a $565,000 watch look like? 18s

What does a $565,000 watch look like?

The Greubel Forsey GMT takes 4-5 months to assemble and a further 5-6 months to test everything. The result? A mind-blowing $565,000 watch!

NeezerD
Published: March 23, 2017Updated: March 24, 20171,714 views
Researchers in Egypt turn prawns into plastic49s

Researchers in Egypt turn prawns into plastic

Researchers at Egypt's Nile University are developing a way to turn dried shrimp shells into biodegradable plastic in a bid to make environmentally-friendly grocery bags. Credit to Reuters.

Reuters
Published: March 3, 20171,563 views
Introducing Handle1m37s

Introducing Handle

Introducing Handle Handle is a research robot that stands 6.5 ft tall, travels at 9 mph and jumps 4​ ​feet vertically. ​It uses electric power to operate both electric and hydraulic actuators, with a range of about 15 miles on one battery charge. ​​​Handle uses many of the same dynamics, balance and mobile manipulation principles​ found in the quadruped and biped robots we build, but with only about 10 actuated joints, it is significantly less complex. Wheels are efficient on flat surfaces while legs can go almost anywhere: by combining wheels and legs Handle can have the best of both worlds.

relaxonline
Published: February 28, 2017Updated: March 1, 2017160 views