Unreal Animals

Baby shark follows scuba divers like a lost puppy1m35s

Baby shark follows scuba divers like a lost puppy

Scuba divers returning from a deep dive in Belize were making their way along the shallow grass bed to their dive boat. As they finished their dive, they met up with an adorable baby nurse shark who approached them much like a lost puppy. These sharks are docile and harmless, occasionally curious, but they have no reason to sit and look at a diver expectantly as this one did. It paused and looked right at divemaster, Danny, waiting at his fins as if he would issue a command or dish out a treat. When he began to swim away, the shark moved under him as if it wanted something and he couldn't resist the urge to give it a little scratch on the back. As the divers continued, the baby shark followed along as if hew were a stray looking to be adopted by a family. It swam under Dave and seemed to be looking for attention. As Dave swam on and met up with Kristy, the shark followed. It was like he was completely at home with his new human friends and was ready to follow them all the way home. Nurse sharks are abundant in Belize. They can reach a size of approximately ten feet and can weigh much more than a full grown man. Powerful swimmers and graceful in the water, they are no threat to people. Although they possess impressive teeth, as any shark does, their mouths are actually designed for feeding on scraps and smaller prey than people. They are not known to attack humans, except if provoked or treated carelessly. Divers find them to be a welcome sight as they occasionally follow a group from a distance and act like curious tagalongs. Baby sharks are seldom seen and this one is smaller than most people are familiar with. Its friendly nature is also exceptional as they don't usually follow divers so closely and they also don't usually seem to want interaction. When careful and respectful, an interaction with wildlife can be the highlight of a dive for scuba enthusiasts. Such encounters should be kept to a minimum and should also be completely on the animal's terms. It is not only dangerous, but it is also unfair to make an animal more comfortable with people than they should be. Such habits can lead to disaster for all. In this case, the divers had very little interaction with the shark before choosing to ignore it as much as possible. He still followed the divers until they reached their boat. His unusual behavior was a treat for these shark lovers.

Man and his grandmother encounter bull casually standing at roadside1m44s

Man and his grandmother encounter bull casually standing at roadside

Cameron and his Grandmother, Doreen, were on their way from a family gathering to Cameron's parents' house. The drive involved an hour of travel through quiet farmland and almost deserted country roads just after sunset. They were surprised to find that on one of their turns, they saw a large, tan colored bull standing casually by the stop sign, grazing on some grass. As Cameron makes the turn, he exclaims "Hey, that was a cow!". We can see the huge beast munching away right at the edge of the road on the left as the headlights light the area up. Cameron pulls to the shoulder of the road just after passing the bull and explains his concern that it will wander out on the road and cause an accident. Bulls can weigh as much as 2,000lbs and colliding with one would be a disaster for the people as well as the animal. Cameron and Doreen debate making a call to report the bull but they quickly decide that the best action is to look for the nearest farm and try to find the owner. They know that they can't leave it standing beside the road. Where this becomes amusing is after the two turn around, Doreen comments that the cow is actually a bull. Her grandson asks if it really is and how she knows. After a careful pause, she says "Well, you can tell." Cameron has obviously spotted what Doreen sees at the back end. Those and the horns suddenly make it obvious to Cameron that this is indeed a bull. Cameron is a little nervous as he realizes that he has pulled up beside the bull and it is close enough to stare right in the passenger window. He jokingly pleads: "Please don't charge my car." and then says: "Hey buddy." as they roll past. Cameron and Doreen found the farm just up the road and let the owner know that the bull had escaped from the field. They returned to make sure that all went smoothly. The last part of the video shows Cameron standing on the road as a car drives past, illuminating the enormous bull on the road as it makes its way home. In fairness to Cameron, he has grown up around many animals, butt not bulls and cows. His grandmother, Doreen however, grew up on a dairy farm in Chilliwack B.C. and is quite an authority on the difference between a cow and a bull. In rural Ontario (Canada) you just never know who you might meet on the side of the road after dark!

Woman Takes Pet Boa Constrictor For Swim21s

Woman Takes Pet Boa Constrictor For Swim

Boas are a group of reptiles that differ from poisonous snakes by the special way they hunt and kill their prey. They are non-venomous serpents renowned for their way of subduing their prey. They do not bite their victims, but suffocate them: they squeeze or constrict them to death (this is where their name Boa Constrictor comes from). In this respect, they are very similar to their close relatives - pythons and anacondas. Though boa constrictors do not reach the same length as their relatives, anacondas and reticulated pythons, these snakes are on the list of the longest snakes in the world. However, boas exceed their non-poisonous brethren in diversity: in nature, they number 60 species. They are also favorite pets to a large number of snake enthusiasts. Their character and nature when observed from up-close is pretty mild, even friendly. Boas are not usually considered deliberately aggressive or malicious pets. In the serpent world they are even known as the beginner-friendly snakes. These snakes, especially young ones, are semi-arboreal. Though they are good swimmers, they prefer to be on dry land or in trees. Because of their large size, they tend to move in a straight line instead of sliding back and forth like minor snakes. Sometimes they hide in the burrows of medium-sized mammals. Now, put two and two together and take your boa constrictor out with you on a little picnic, like the young woman did with hers in the video above. Watch! Isn’t it awesome to actually take your pet animal out in nature and let it have fun?! So cool! The woman has taken her boa constrictor pet out in nature for a little swim in the pond. Look how the boa follows its owner in the water. There are other people around who have also taken their boas out and it seems to us that this is some sort of a retreat purposefully intended for a little hang out between boa enthusiasts. how amazing is that? Apart from terrariums at home, boa constrictors live exclusively in the Western hemisphere and this is why they are often referred to as New World snakes. The habitats of these reptiles are also diverse: they can be found in South and Central America, in Cuba, in the west and southwest of North America, in northern Africa, in South and Central Asia, on the islands of the Malay Archipelago, Madagascar, Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad Island, and New Guinea. Some species (rubber snakes and Californian boas) live in the western states of the United States, as well as in the south-west of Canada. Sand boas, or boa constrictors, are widespread in Central and South Asia, as well as in East and North Africa, the Middle East, Asian countries (Iran, Afghanistan, Western China, India, Pakistan). Several species live on the territory of Russia (Dagestan, Central, and Eastern Transcaucasia) and CIS countries (Kazakhstan, Mongolia). What do you think about this video? Make sure you tell us more in the comments down below. If you like what you see, don’t forget to share it with others who might like it as well. It just might be the highlight of their day! Enjoy!

Fly-mimicking weevil communicates by drumming with snout57s

Fly-mimicking weevil communicates by drumming with snout

This little Weevil from the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador is about 5 mm in size and mimics a Flesh Fly, which protects it from predators such as birds because they do not waste time trying to catch what seems to be such swift prey. As shown in this video, these Weevils communicate with their partners by drumming with the snout on a leaf. When two weevils reside on the same leaf they alternate in drumming. Vibrational communication is known from other insects, such as Treehoppers.

Gigantic dock spider enjoys being hand fed1m16s

Gigantic dock spider enjoys being hand fed

Dock spiders are the largest species in Canada. They are a common sight at cottages and at almost every lake in North America. They commonly reach three inches across, a size that can make even the bravest of us dive into the water for escape. But luckily, dock spiders aren't very interested in people and pose no threat to us. This dock spider, affectionately know as "Larry", was seen lazing in the sun, watching closely as the dock was being repaired very close by. He wasn't at all shy about people walking past and trepidation turned to fascination. Horse flies buzzed around and took chunks out of unwilling victims at every opportunity and Larry might have even been able to sense this. With a GoPro in hand, our cottager inched closer and began recording Larry. Sure enough, a large horse fly landed in front of Larry and he lunged for it. Appreciation for Larry instantly soared and our cottagers had a thought. As they swatted horse flies, they decided to see what this monster would do if they served them up as a snack. Nobody was brave enough to hold their hand out, and for good reason. Dock spiders have sharp fangs and venom that would leave a human in a lot of pain. They have lightning quick reflexes and sharp vision too. No, Larry needed to be served from a safe distance. A dead horsefly was mounted on a skewer and wiggled in front of the spiders nose. Using his front legs to grasp the fly and pull it in close, the spider bit right into it. Even when holding one fly in its mouth, this spider was quick to lunge at or grab a second. Surprisingly, it even attacked and ate other large spiders on the dock. Known for being hunters instead of web spinners, dock spiders will eat large insects and even very small fish. They dangle their front legs in the water and sense vibrations created by approaching prey. This is one of few instances where an invertebrate is capable of preying on a vertebrate. As if all of this wasn't creepy enough, dock spiders are able to run on top of water due to a waterproof coating on their legs. They can even trap air against their bodies, enough to scuba dive for up to half an hour as they hunt or hide from predators. They can literally be anywhere at the cottage or lake, even watching you as you swim past. It's perfectly normal to be squeamish about these fearsome creatures. In fact, fear of arachnids is the second most common irrational fear among humans, surpassed only by the fear of public speaking. But before we make a run for it, or worse, grab a rolled up newspaper, consider that these dock "monsters" can see us clearly and are determined to avoid contact with us whenever possible. And if we leave them where they are, they are ridding your cottage area of other spiders and of those incredibly annoying horseflies. You may even want to try getting close enough to hand feed one to show your appreciation. Or not....

Bright green orchid bees filmed in Ecuadorian rainforest1m53s

Bright green orchid bees filmed in Ecuadorian rainforest

This footage from Jardín Botánico "Las Orquídeas" in Puyo, Ecuador shows orchid bees (metallic green) and eulaema (yellow, black and brown) collecting perfume from the tulip orchid in the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador. These orchids do not produce nectar to attract pollinators, but fragrances which are collected by male orchid bees in order to seduce females. The bees collect perfume with brushes on their forelegs and transfer it in flight via the middle legs to cavities on the enlarged hind legs.

Catfish Literally Climb Onto Land To Get Some Treats1m09s

Catfish Literally Climb Onto Land To Get Some Treats

Man landing on the Moon, or man soaring the skies, or even fish walking on land, oh, the fancies of days long gone! Yet, history and scientific development shows that these things turned out not to be so fanciful in the end. Man landed on the Moon in the middle of the last century, we are soaring the skies just for fun either with airplanes or with various flying gears and, the most interesting thing of it all – fish do walk on land, but our sciences were not developed enough to grasp all these facts. There are several types of fish who are known to go out of water their natural habitat, and temporarily venture onto dry land. Why is this so amazing? Because, unlike us, who breathe on lungs, using the oxygen from the air, fish breathing apparatus can take in only that oxygen which is dispensed into water. The strange mangrove killifish who lives in the flooded mangrove woods in Florida, the Caribbean, and Latin America. They can change their gills just to live out, on land. They have to. When the water below the mangroves dries up, they have to adapt. They even leap onto the tree branches and wait until the water comes back. The climbing Gouramis are decorative fish with a little-known ability to climb. They inhabit the waters in Africa and Southern Asia. Same as the mangrove killifish, the gouramis travel to the next water source if their own home dries out. The most recent discovery is the climbing catfish. It is a member of the catfish family can actually grasp surface with their pelvic fin. In the video at the top of the page, taken at Kankaria Lake in India, you can see a school of catfish skillfully venturing out on land. Tourists are feeding the catfish with snacks and they, one by one, without waiting their turn, climb the stairs with the help of their muscular fins and a powerful swing on their tails and catch the pieces of food thrown at them. You must admit, it is a strange site to observe. However, unlike the gourami, the mangrove killifish, and man’s concurring the air and the Moon, we must admit there is bountiful lore about walking catfish. Legends, fishermen and old wives tales are full of stories of magical catfish , which, eagerly waiting for dusk, slowly dive up from the murky depths of the lakes or rivers they inhabit during the day and swim out to the surface. In all that lore, catfish either go out to the fields and steal the crops or turn into their other selves – usually beautiful damsels or enchanted princes. Recent scientific discoveries prove these stories, even though product of the fanciful mind of the storyteller, do have a thread of fact upon which they are weaved. What would do if you saw a fish go out on land? This is a real possibility if you happen to come across any of these fascinating creatures. Even though it might be hard to wrap your head around, this is no joke these amazing fish really do exist. What did you think about this video? Make sure you tell us more in the comments down below. If you like what you see, don’t forget to share it with others who might like it as well. It just might be the highlight of their day! Enjoy! .

Man Helps Cow Get United With Her Newborn Calf 3m03s

Man Helps Cow Get United With Her Newborn Calf

Flo is a cow who lives on a beautiful farm near Millbrook, Ontario. She spends her days in a lush, green pasture that borders on a country road. The cows have access to a nice pond for drinking and for cooling off in. She shares this pasture with a herd of cows and some newborn calves. Flo delivered a calf herself but it was born on a slope between the pond and the fence. It slid down and under the fence, becoming trapped outside the field. It's not clear how long the calf was lying there, but the fresh umbilical cord showed that it had been born that day. The calf was also dry, which suggested that it had been lying in the sun for a little while. The calf may have tried to get back to its mother but the electric fence made this impossible. Dave was passing by on the road when he saw the cows enjoying a dip in the pond to get out of the heat. He stopped to film the cows as they did so. He noticed a cow to his left that was acting agitated. Dave doesn't know a lot about cows but he knew it was unusual for a female to scrape the dirt and make so much noise. He set his camera on the fence post and watched, confused by what was going on. He could see that her ear tag said "Flo". He eventually noticed that she was looking through the fence and then back at him. She repeatedly mooed at him and at the fence. She seemed a little frantic as she cried and he walked closer with his camera to see what she was doing. It became obvious that she had been asking for help. Dave saw her newborn calf in the long grass but he wasn't sure if her behavior had been a cry for help or a warning to stay away from her baby. The calf needed to get milk from the mother and he could also wander out on the road if something wasn't done. There was no gate nearby and Dave didn't want to try carrying and moving the calf far away from Flo. Dave decided that the best way to help was to lift the wires and push the calf under the fence . The calf seemed to be helping a little in the effort, but there was no way to avoid contact with the fence. Flo seemed to understand that her calf was being moved toward her, but Dave was very aware that only a flimsy fence would be between them if she became upset with what was happening. Dave was getting shocked and the calf was too. He hoped it would not cry out in pain before he could get the job done. Eventually, the calf was on the other side of the fence and reunited with his mom. The two immediately sniffed each other and began walking out into the pasture together. Dave spoke with the farmer and his wife, who did not realize that she had calved. They invited Dave to join them as they tagged the calf's ear and treated the umbilical cord with iodine. They checked the calf and found that it was healthy and unharmed. Dave took his camera along and filmed the two as they mingled with the herd. The calf wandered up to Dave for a curious sniff, as did Flo, seemingly recognizing him. They both wandered off and Flo's little calf was soon happily nursing as if nothing had happened. Although Dave was slow to catch on, Flo was obviously distressed and was aware that Dave could help her. She looked at him expectantly as she paced between him and her baby in a very clear attempt to communicate. We often underestimate an animal's intelligence and capacity for emotion. Flo showed a healthy amount of both in this case. You can't deny the love she felt for her newborn calf.

Baby bird flies into girl's hair and needs saving55s

Baby bird flies into girl's hair and needs saving

A group of friends were out for dinner on King Street in Toronto. They were on their way to a bar when they saw a fast moving object fly into a girl's hair. At first the group thought it was a moth and then someone else yelled bird and finally someone yelled BAT! After everyone erupted into screams one of the girls bravely went through this stranger's hair and carefully pulled out a frightened baby bird. She carefully cradled the bird in her hands so make sure it didn't fly into oncoming traffic. They tried looking for the nest or signs of the mother to put the baby bird back safely. The bird flew out of her hands at one point and it was clear it didn't know how to fly properly yet and flew into the busy road. After checking that the road was clear, they retrieved the bird from the street to make sure it didn't get run over. Sadly, the group wasn't able to find its home and had to place the bird in a potted plant close to where they saw it fly down from. Hopefully the mother can find her baby bird!

Worried Mama Cow Asks Man To Rescue Her Newborn Calf3m05s

Worried Mama Cow Asks Man To Rescue Her Newborn Calf

Flo is a cow who lives on a beautiful farm near Millbrook, Ontario. She spends her days in a lush, green pasture that borders on a country road. The cows have access to a nice pond for drinking and for cooling off in. She shares this pasture with a herd of cows and some newborn calves. Flo delivered a calf herself but it was born on a slope between the pond and the fence. It slid down and under the fence, becoming trapped outside the field. It's not clear how long the calf was lying there, but the fresh umbilical cord showed that it had been born that day. It was also dry, which suggested that it had been lying in the sun for a little while. The calf may have tried to get back to its mother but the electric fence made this impossible. Dave was passing by on the road when he saw the cows enjoying a dip in the pond to get out of the heat. He stopped to film the cows as they did so. He noticed a cow to his left that was acting agitated. Dave doesn't know a lot about cows but he knew it was unusual for a female to scrape the dirt and make so much noise. He set his camera on the fence post and watched, confused by what was going on. He could see that her ear tag said "Flo". He eventually noticed that she was looking through the fence and then back at him. She seemed a little frantic as she cried and he walked closer with his camera to see what she was doing. It became obvious that she had been asking for help. Dave saw her newborn calf in the long grass but he wasn't sure if her behavior had been a cry for help or a warning to stay away from her baby. The calf needed to get milk from the mother and he could also wander out on the road if something wasn't done. There was no gate nearby and Dave didn't want to try moving the calf far away from Flo. Dave decided that the best way to help was to lift the wires and push the calf under the fence. The calf seemed to be helping the man, but there was no way to avoid contact with the fence. Flo seemed to understand that her calf was being moved toward her, but Dave was very aware that only a flimsy fence would be between them if she became upset with what was happening. Dave was getting shocked and the calf was too. He hoped it would not cry out in pain before he could get the job done. Eventually, the calf was on the other side of the fence and reunited with his mom. The two immediately sniffed each other and began walking out into the pasture together. Dave spoke with the farmer and his wife, who did not realize that she had calved. They invited Dave to join them as they tagged the calf's ear and treated the umbilical cord with iodine. They checked the calf and found that it was healthy and unharmed. Dave took his camera along and filmed the two as they mingled with the herd. The calf wandered up to Dave for a curious sniff, as did Flo, seemingly recognizing him. They both wandered off and Flo's little calf was soon happily nursing as if nothing had happened. Although Dave was slow to catch on, Flo was obviously distressed and was aware that Dave could help her. She looked at him expectantly as she paced between him and her baby in a very clear attempt to communicate. We often underestimate an animal's intelligence and capacity for emotion. Flo showed a healthy amount of both in this case. You can't deny the love she felt for her newborn calf.

Wild cedar waxwing feeds chick perched on human's finger34s

Wild cedar waxwing feeds chick perched on human's finger

These wild cedar waxwing fledglings were found sitting in the grass in a nearby children's park. The parents may have urged them out of the nest, but they were unable to fly, climb much, or feed themselves so they may have possibly been knocked out by something else. The nest was far too tall to reach so they made a make-shift nest out of a basket, dry leaves, grass, and ribbon to tie it into the tree. Before she was able to put the nest into the tree, the parents came for a visit and decided to feed the babies while she was hanging on to them. This was a completely wild bird! So cool!

BirdoLynn
Published: May 30, 201872 plays$0.08 earned
Horses share incredible friendship, can't bear to be separated1m31s

Horses share incredible friendship, can't bear to be separated

Horses are highly social animals. They form deep and complicated attachments to other horses, people, and occasionally to other animals such as dogs and cats. They display emotions and often have very sensitive personalities. Able to pick up on and take meaning from even the smallest non verbal behavior, their responses to their companions' actions and moods are surprisingly complex. These two horses have a very deep and heart warming friendship. They are completely inseparable and hardly leave the other horse's side, even for a moment. Stardust is a white filly and Dreamer is a brown gelding. They were both born on this beautiful farm in southern Ontario on the same day. They spent their first year and a half in the same meadows and in stalls beside each other. It's no surprise that they became best friends right from the start. Their mothers had also grown up together and the four horses did everything together in the early days. Running, playing, and eating all involved the entire group. But each of the mothers were sent to different riding schools last summer and they were both accompanied by their young. The effect was heart breaking, with all of the horses showing obvious signs of missing the others, but the two young horses were particularly affected. They called repeatedly each night in the barn, as if trying to find their friend. They both acted broken-hearted and lost for weeks. Eventually, both returned to their home and resumed life on their own farm. Dreamer arrived first and he ran through the meadow and stood in the barn, calling loudly, obviously looking for his pal. Stardust came the next day and the reunion brought a tear to everybody's eyes. The two began calling out as soon as Stardust got out of the horse trailer. They became very excited when it was obvious that Stardust was also back home. The two were turned out it their usual meadow, along with their mothers. The young horses sniffed each other, rubbed heads and necks and then both rolled on the ground together. As if acting on the exact same thought, they both sprang to their feet and ran full speed around the meadow, side by side for almost an hour. They stopped occasionally to rub their heads on each other and whimper excitedly, then they were off again. From that point on, Dreamer and Stardust will not wander more than a few feet away from each other. They graze side by side, or sometimes with their heads almost touching. They stand face to face and groom each other constantly. They can be seen here performing mutual massage and grooming with their lips and teeth. Amazingly, neither of them ever flinches as they bite and nibble the other's shoulder. neck and back. This behavior is a sign of deep affection between horses and can be used to convey respect, trust and caring. Horses have very sensitive lips that can act almost like a hand to grasp and move things. They use this same behavior to greet humans, often taking a person's hand or fingers gently in their lips. They may even stand like this for a few moments, as if holding your hand. It will also give the horse a sense of your own trust and comfort level and they will be aware of your every movement, as well as your breathing and your posture. A lot can be learned from horses and how they interact with us and with each other. Taking a few moments to really watch how they respond can be a beautiful experience.

Incredible Footage Shows Newborn Boa Constrictor Still In Amniotic Sac34s

Incredible Footage Shows Newborn Boa Constrictor Still In Amniotic Sac

Life is so amazing! This is a boa constrictor still in its amniotic sac that has just been born. Little guy hasn't even had its first breath yet. So amazing to witness! It might be strange to see a snake in a sack, rather than a soft-shell egg, like we are used to seeing them. But according to a page on Wikipedia, both reptiles (this includes snakes) and mammals are members of the clade "Amniotes", meaning that these animals possess amniotic sacs. They may also further protect the fetus with a shell, but this is not necessarily the case for all amniotes and many species have gained and then lost shells as they evolved. Chickens also have amniotic sacs in their eggs. There is an incredibly thin membrane between the shell and the egg white, which is technically the amniotic sac. Despite the ominous part of their name, boa constrictors are actually quite frequently kept as domestic pets. The give birth to live young, where the mother bite through the sac to release the young. Boas are among the 30% of snakes that do give birth to their young, as opposed to pythons, which are classified as being ovoviviparous, meaning that their eggs emerge inside of the body. Boa mothers carry their young for between 100 and 150 days. Boa litters typically account about 25 baby boa constrictors, but can be as low as 10 snakes to an incredible count of 64.

Massive Crocodile Holds Up Traffic To Cross Road1m13s

Massive Crocodile Holds Up Traffic To Cross Road

Check out this huge crocodile in the Kakadu National Park (NT Australia). When something like that is crossing the road, you stop and wait! The footage shows a giant crocodile slowly making its way across an elevated river road blocking the cars. As the scaly critter makes contact with the road across the lake a small car approaches, hoping to cross this road . The huge beast is just peacefully making its way and it is not interested in any cars. He appears to have no goal in mind other than crossing the road - a feat that he achieves at a painfully slow rate. Barely indistinguishable among the rocks jutting out of the water, the large reptile's head nudges closer to the slightly submerged path. However, seemingly alarmed by the presence of the snapper the driver grinds to a halt as the crocodile hauls itself up onto dry land and begins its journey to the other side. But, unfortunately for the waiting car, the the reptile comes to a stop right in the middle of the road - the crossing proving just too exhausting. Luckily, it is just a brief stop, even crocodiles have to take a breath while performing such an incredible tasks. This is not something we see every day, it is astonishingly unbelievable sight! Slowly but surely the croc reaches the other side, splashing back into the water allowing the cars to go on with their journey. Did you know that the largest crocodile in captivity was 20 ft 3 in (6.17 m), and weighed 2,370 lbs (1,075 kg)? It was called Lolong and he was also the biggest crocodile ever measured from snout-to-tail.

DanieleFazio
Published: May 22, 201827,147 plays$41.88 earned