folk

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Old Irish Folk Traditions. The Sweat House 2m34s

Old Irish Folk Traditions. The Sweat House

Tucked away in the back of many fields and in out of the way places in Ireland are small overgrown huts that look like miniature tombs. They are constructed of stone with small entrances and covered with sods, they are, in fact, sweat houses. It may come as a surprise to many that Ireland has its own tradition of the ‘sweat lodge', mostly we associate this with the Native American culture and, for some time, American style sweat lodges have been conducted here also. These are mostly based on the Inipi ceremony of the North American Plains Indians and a sweat is undertaken usually for initiation, purification or in preparation for the vision quest. Were our own sweat houses used for similar purposes? Firstly, it must be stated that little information has survived to tell us what exactly they were used for. Although sweat houses seem to have been constructed up to the end of the nineteenth century(1) the knowledge of their use has been forgotten through lack of interest, embarrassment or as a result of the destruction and mass emigration of the famine. It has been pointed out that, in post-famine Ireland, there seems to have been a kind of aversion to old ways and natural things that has resulted in the outwardly respectable and ultra-conservative attitude that can be found in many parts of the country today. An example of this was the idea of "famine food", which was the eating of any kind of wild food, i.e. blackberries, implying that one had to be hard up to eat it. As for the sweat houses many nineteenth century antiquarians variously reported that it was used as a ‘sweating cure' for many different ailments - and this seems to be true up to a point. However, as in many societies when faced with foreign anthropologists, the temptation to lead them up the garden path is enormous. It has also been pointed out that the investment in turf required to heat one of the sweat houses would have been in the order of two and a half donkey loads. This would have been an extravagant expense simply to get rid of the few aches and pains that most of the population suffered from anyway. In order to be more worthwhile, the use of these structures must have been important indeed. The sweat houses are distributed over a number of counties, primarily Leitrim, Louth, Cavan, Fermanagh and parts of Sligo. These were all poor counties so it is doubly interesting given the economic investment in the use of the sweat house. Sweat houses are also sited away from dwellings and are often close to streams. They can be quite hard to find as I can attest to having looked for examples on the Cooley Peninsula. The houses are usually about 1.75m high and 2m in diameter with a small entrance and often a small smoke hole which could be covered with a flat slab. The method of heating was described as building a fire in the house and allowing it to completely burn out, the ashes were then raked out and rushes or other plants strewn on the floor. A stone was placed over the smoke hole and the patient entered naked. The door was blocked and the patient sweated profusely, the plants on the floor giving off moisture to give an effect similar to a sauna. Soot has been found inside the sweat houses showing that a fire was built in them, however, John Matthews assures me that he has come across references to the use of hot rocks heated outside the sweat house and then placed inside - much the Native American methods. After the sweat, the patient would emerge and go for a swim in the river as in modern Scandinavian saunas. If old or infirm they would go to bed for a few hours(2). It has also been recorded that mixed groups of men and women used sweat houses,

Alex Jones Rants as an Indie Folk Song2m46s

Alex Jones Rants as an Indie Folk Song

Alex Jones’s popularity — and particularly his ties with the current president of the United States — is a disturbing reflection of the political moment. Which may be exactly why viewers of the Super Deluxe video found it so satisfying to see Jones’s signature combative delivery disarmed by hearing it turned into a gently ethereal folk song, one that made his rage merely ridiculous. https://epeak.info/2017/07/15/this-is-what-alex-jones-rants-sound-like-when-turned-into-a-bon-iver-song/

Iron Maiden Cover Played On Traditional Folk Instruments4m06s

Iron Maiden Cover Played On Traditional Folk Instruments

This is so cool! What an awesome twist on the famous Iron Maiden Song, 'The Trooper'. Finnish band Steve'n'Seagulls definitely know how to make an awesome cover! The amount of talent they have is crazy, their originality shown through the cover is amazing and is so catchy, you can't help but move your head from side to side, awesome! They used traditional folk instruments for this twist, they are definitely pros when it comes to singing and playing their instruments, what an amazing sight to see. It always nice when we get to see people share their incredible talent, so impressive! Recorded by Jaakko Manninen. This Finnish band loves to put twists on well-known hard rock and metal songs. Lucky for us, we get to listen to their music! They became very popular with their version of 'Thunderstruck' which was originally made by AC/DC. The members of the band are Remmel, Herman, Hiltunen, Pukki and Puikkonen. It's not everyday you get to witness a band that is as original as Steve'n'Seagulls. You won't regret listening to this Finnish band, they are very entertaining! If you are fascinated by this talented band, look up some more of their videos! So cool! Do you find traditional folk instruments interesting? Check out some of these Folk and World Instrument Accessories. Why not learn how to play such a cool and unique instrument? What a great way to use some of your free time! What other bands do you like to listen too? Let us know in the comment section down below!

sivijoha
Published: June 13, 201411,247,258 views
Nordic Folk Group Performs Funeral Song On Side Of Mountain8m52s

Nordic Folk Group Performs Funeral Song On Side Of Mountain

Wardruna is a Norwegian music group dedicated to creating musical renditions of Norse cultural and esoteric traditions. During this year’s Trænafestivalen (Træna Music Festival), Wardruna had the closing slot, where they performed “Helvegen”, an old Norwegian funeral song. Singers Aurora and Oslo Fagottkor can be seen in the front, with the rest of the company perched on a rock in the back. The atmosphere on the small island of Træna, in the sea gorge on the Helgeland coast, Nordland, was perfect for their rendition of the song. The like a natural concert hall, the cave echoes in the voices of Wardruna, giving the song it’s much deserved eeriness and chilly mood. “Helvegen", meaning "the Road to Hel" is the final track in the Runaljod - Yggdrasil album. The song (and album) closes with the famous stanza from Hávamál: "Cattle die, kinsmen die, You yourself will also die, but the word about you will never die, if you win a good reputation. Cattle die, kinsmen die, You yourself will also die, I know one that never dies: the judgement of those who died". "Helvegen" was used in the second season of Vikings while Ragnar and his men prepare to sail again to Wessex.

ViralHog
Published: September 20, 201742 views