NataliaCara

Ocelot cub discovers rescued manatees, tries to play with them1m27s

Ocelot cub discovers rescued manatees, tries to play with them

At first, this adorable rescued Ocelot cub was just checking out the water, but Manatees are very curious animals, and they know that when we tap the water is to give them their bottles, so when she did it, they went to her. As every kitten, she is also very curious, and was fascinated by the young Manatees, and she soon learned that they came when she tapped the water, so she would do it, then wait for them to come over, and observe them until they swam away... and then do it all over again! Both the Ocelot and the Manatees are orphans, and had to be rescued at a very early age, and now live at a rescue center. They are all still young, which makes them even more curious and wanting to make new friends and play. The Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is a small wild cat, but it is the biggest member of the genus Leopardus, which also includes the Margay (Leopardus wiedii), the Northern Tiger Cat (Leopardus tigrinus), the Andean Mountain Cat (Leopardus jacobita), the Kodkod (Leopardus guigna), the Geoffroy's Cat (Leopardus geoffroyi), Pampas Cat (Leopardus colocolo), and the Southern Tiger Cat (Leopardus guttulus). It is native to the Americas and can be found in various habits, such as tropical forests, thorn scrub regions, savannah grasslands, marshes and mangrove forests. The Amazonian Manatee (Trichechus inunguis), as the name suggests, is native to the Amazonian rivers of South America. It is the smallest species of manatee described so far, although there is the possibility of a smaller one, the Dwarf Manatee (Trichechus pygmaeus), but it is not recognized as a species at the moment. The Amazonian Manatee shares the Trichechus genus with the West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus) and the West African Manatee (Trichechus senegalensis), but is the only species that lives exclusively in freshwater.

NataliaCara
Published: November 11, 20182,458 plays$2.53 earned
Adorable rescued mongoose loves head scratches!1m19s

Adorable rescued mongoose loves head scratches!

This adorable Yellow Mongoose had to be rescued, and now lives at a wildlife sanctuary. Mongooses can be very aggressive, but this one absolutely loves attention, and begs for had scratches like a dog or a cat would do. The Yellow Mongoose (Cynictis penicillata) is native to Southern Africa, and can be found in open, semi-arid areas, such as grasslands, scrub and semi-desert scrub. It is rarely seen in deserts, mountains or forests. It belongs to the Herpestidae family, along with 29 other species of mongooses from Africa and Southern Eurasia, 4 species of dwarf mongooses, and the Meerkat (Suricata suricatta). The Yellow Mongoose is the only member of the Cynictis genus, but it has several subspecies, based on color variation, size and hair and tail length. They are carnivorous, feeding on small animals such as lizards, snakes, amphibians, small mammals, but mainly insects and other invertebrates. They also eat all sorts of eggs. They have strong claws, used for digging and grabbing their food. They live underground, and may share the burrow with other species. Yellow Mongooses are facultatively social; they may den socially, cooperating in the rearing the pups and defending the territory, but they forage alone. They are diurnal animals, although nocturnal activity had been recorded. They are generally quiet animals, although high-pitched screams can be heard when they are fighting, as well as low defensive growls, and a short bark when alarm calling. They can also make a soft purring sound when mating. Yellow mongooses breed seasonally, twice a year. The female gives birth from one to three pups per litter; first, around October, and then between December and February. The pups are weaned around two months old, when they leave the burrow to forage with the adults for the first time, and become independent between four and five months of age.

NataliaCara
Published: November 4, 2018172 plays$0.30 earned
Rescued Wild Dog having lunch18s

Rescued Wild Dog having lunch

This Wild Dog had to be rescued at an early age, so now it has to live at a wildlife sanctuary. Just as house dogs, food time is his favorite time! The African Wild Dog (Lycaon pictus), also known as African Painted Dog, is one of the most endangered mammals in the world! It was been considered endangered for over twenty years, and with an estimate of about 6,600 remaining in the wild. They are not only shot or poisoned by farmers, for being accused of killing livestock, but their main threat is habitat fragmentation, which not only subjects them to disease outbreaks, but increases the human-wild dog conflict. Wild Dogs are highly social animals, and almost exclusively live in packs, usually of up to ten individuals, but packs with over 40 members have been recorded. A lone Wild Dog has a very slim chance of survival, and packs don’t accept new members, which is why an animal such as the one in the video cannot be returned to the wild. There is monogamous alpha mating pair in charge of the pack, but the pups are the ones who get to feed first, and the rest of the group has to patiently wait for their turn. The pack shares a very strong bond and when a member is injured or ill, and is unable to hunt, the other ones will care for it and feed it, making sure it doesn't die. Because the pack has such a coordinated nature, they have a 80% success rate with hunts, making them extremely effective predators! Because they communicate so well, they are even able to change strategy during a hunt. Their scientific name means "painted dog", due to their mottled coat, which has brown, yellow, white and black colors. And even though that is true for every Wild Dog, each of them will have a unique pattern, which makes them easy to be visually identified.

NataliaCara
Published: October 29, 2018381 plays$0.16 earned
Incredibly rare encounter with North Atlantic Right Whale33s

Incredibly rare encounter with North Atlantic Right Whale

The North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is one of the most endangered whales in the world, with an estimate of only 300-450 individuals remaining! There are two other species of Right Whale: the Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis), and the North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica). All three species received this name because whalers referred to them as the "right" whales to kill, due to their large amount of oil and baleen, which had many uses. Also, they usually travel at no more than about 10 miles per hour, making them easy to capture, and they float once they are dead, making the carcass much easier to salvage. They came close to extinction by 1750, and although they became internationally protected in the first half of the 20th century, they might still go extinct in about 20 years. The populations of Southern Right Whale have been growing since, but the North Atlantic Right Whale is still very rare. In spite of whaling no longer being a threat to them, their main causes of known mortality are entanglement in fishing gear and vessel strikes. When ships run into them, the damage is often fatal; they might die at the time of the impact, or later, from blood loss or other complications. And although Ship strikes and fishing gear entanglement are the leading causes of death for North Atlantic Right Whales, they aren't the only ones. Right Whales are very sensitive to noise, so the sound pollution from seismic airguns, etc., is another very real threat, especially when combined with the first two. This video was shot while researching the whales with the Mingan Island Cetacean Study (MICS), for conservation purposes. The motor was turned off, to avoid any accidents. They must be admired from a safe distance, and must not be approached.

NataliaCara
Published: October 26, 20181,686 plays$1.31 earned
Curious coatis won't leave caretaker alone!1m02s

Curious coatis won't leave caretaker alone!

These coatis used to be kept at a very young age. But in spite of having been legally bought, coatis are still wild animals, and make terrible pets, even though they extremely cute and makes you want to cuddle them. So, after a little while, their owner realized that was a really bad idea, donating them to an institute that could care for them properly. But those animals, growing up as pets, could not be released, for they are now humanized, and are no longer afraid of people. So they started being used for educational purposes, so that students could learn how to properly handle wildlife, but in order to do that, they would have to not attack the students handling them, which, for a coati, is a lot to ask. So their caretaker had to sit with them, every day, for them to get accustomed to it, and cooperate, otherwise they would simply be animals in captivity. South American Coatis (Nasua nasua) are very energetic animals, and extremely curious! They spend most of their time exploring, climbing, while looking for food or anything else they can steal, causing trouble in the process! They don't take no for an answer, and will climb on people and search every inch of them, trying to find something they consider interesting! They have a very similar personality to raccoons, members of the same family (Procyonidae). In this video you can clearly observe these behaviors. One of wants to check out everything: "could there be something hidden in the sleeves, or underneath the lab coat, or maybe I'll check if there's something on her back!". The other one is clearly obsessed with his caretaker's pocket! He doesn't want anything else, just whatever is in the pocket! And he's not willing to share it either! So determined! Animals are so funny!

NataliaCara
Published: October 25, 2018837 plays$0.53 earned
Rescued cheetahs gorge themselves1m17s

Rescued cheetahs gorge themselves

A wild ostrich was found dead on a fence, and fed to the four rescued cheetahs. The cats had a feast, to the point where they could barely move and wouldn't even stop panting, but even then they would try and eat some more, when we got there to remove the carcass. I couple of them just gave up! Look at those faces!

Funny rescued manatee savors tasty banana20s

Funny rescued manatee savors tasty banana

This adorable young manatee was found beached when he was just a little baby and had to be rescued and cared for at a marina mammal rehabilitation center, and hopefully, will soon be released back into the ocean. Animals in captivity need to be fed a balanced diet, to insure they receive all the nutrients they need to stay healthy, so he is given a couple of bananas a day, along with seaweed, grass and other vegetables. He used to be bottle-fed a special formula, as well, but he has been weaned, now that he is old enough. Manatees eat a lot, but he particularly loves the bananas! He takes one as soon as they are thrown in the tank, dives, then emerges on the other side of it, where he can eat it without being bothered by the others. He then leans his face against the tank wall and simply savors it! It takes him forever to eat the banana, but he enjoys every second of it! It's hilarious! The West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus) is the largest species of Sirenians alive. The Sirenia order also includes the Amazonian Manatee (Trichechus inunguis) and the African Manatee (Trichechus senegalensis). The West Indian Manatee is currently divided into two subspecies, the Florida Manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) and the Antillean Manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), although recent data indicates three separate lineages: one in Florida and the Greater Antilles; another in Western and Southern Gulf of Mexico, Central America, and Northwestern South America, West of the Lesser Antilles; and the third one on Northeastern South America, East of the Lesser Antilles. Evidence indicates that there might be hybridization with the Amazonian Manatee, in some areas near the mouth of the Amazon. In 2017 the West Indian Manatee’s status has been downgraded from endangered to threatened, but it's essential to have stronger emphasis on preserving and restoring warm water habitats, and increase the reports of manatee boat strikes, in order to sustain this progress.

NataliaCara
Published: August 30, 201814,506 plays$8.21 earned
Rescued raccoon has peculiar way of scratching itself31s

Rescued raccoon has peculiar way of scratching itself

This funny Crab-eating Raccoon has neurological problems and had to be rescued. She is monitored by a veterinary and receives really good care. She might have an odd appearance and behavior, but we must agree that she has a very captivating way of scratching her head! In reality, rubbing the posterior part of the neck against objects is a form of territorial marking in this species. The marking is done using vertical or rotating movements of the head. And as it can be observed in the video, glandular secretions, usually from their anal glands, are also used for marking, as well as urine and feces. Crab-eating Raccoons (Procyon cancrivorus), also known as South American Raccoons, are native to South and Central America. They inhabit marshy and jungle areas, and feed mostly on crabs, lobsters, crayfish and other crustaceans and shellfish, such as oysters and clams, but being omnivorous, they also eat fruit, turtle eggs and small amphibians. They are about the same size as common raccoons, in spite of looking smaller, due to its much shorter fur. Although it is naturally rare in some of the areas of its range, and unlike its Northern cousin, it doesn't adapt well to human activity, the species is listed as Least Concern, because it has a wide distribution range. They are nocturnal, solitary, and active at ground level. They have well-developed tactile senses, particularly in the nose and hands, using their hands as tools. They use their hands to handle and manipulate food before placing it in their mouths, and can manipulate small prey items. They can also be observed dipping their food in the water before eating it. Some studies have placed raccoons' intelligence above cats' but below primates', when it comes to discriminate objects. They also showed that raccoons can learn quickly and retain knowledge for up to a year. Female distribution is limited by resources such as water, food, and den sites, whereas males might be driven by the densities and spatial distribution of females. They have excellent nighttime vision, in spite of being color blind, and have 13 different vocalizations recognized so far, 7 of which are between the mother and young.

NataliaCara
Published: August 22, 201815,343 plays$12.70 earned
Orphaned baby monkey doesn't want caretaker to leave33s

Orphaned baby monkey doesn't want caretaker to leave

This adorable Vervet Monkey was orphaned and rescued at a very early age, and had to grow up and a wildlife center. She will be released back into the wild, some day, but in the meantime, she needs a foster mom, which is what her caretaker is to her. In order to be able to return to the wild, she can't be humanized, which means that she can't be used to people, or she would approach them once she's free, and it would result in her either getting captured and kept as a pet, or killed, so her foster mom can't do anything a monkey wouldn't do, such as talking to her. But since keeping her company is required, the caretaker sits with her for hours, but even after all that time, the baby monkey still doesn't want her to leave, and keeps jumping on her shoulder, and screams and she finally manages to.

NataliaCara
Published: August 15, 20188,355 plays$13.66 earned
Adorable rescued baby monkey1m12s

Adorable rescued baby monkey

This orphan Vervet Monkey had to be rescued and now lives at a wildlife sanctuary. He is very curious and loves to interact with his caretakers! Just look at that face!

NataliaCara
Published: August 10, 2018750 plays$0.66 earned
Majestic Sable Antelopes Gather Near Human1m02s

Majestic Sable Antelopes Gather Near Human

These beautiful Sable Antelopes live in a reserve where they can roam around freely all day and not worry about hunters. Even though they are always grazing and browsing, every once in a while they are given pellets, and being approached by such amazing animals is quite the experience! During the grazing, the group can spread out, but the animals try to stay within sight of each other. The maker of this video managed to record a rare sighting of Sable Antelopes almost interacting with a human in the wild. But, apart from having seen a specimen in the zoo what do we know about the most elegant antelope on the planet? The Sable Antelope, also known as African or Black Antelope (Hippotragus niger for scientists), is a beautiful and graceful animal with a number of distinctive features that are not characteristic of other species of antelope. Both males and females of the species have horns distinguished with a large number of rings and have a semicircular, curved back shape. Their horns can reach about 160 cm in length, and their ends are incredibly sharp. Crescent and powerful, they are so sharp that they are often compared to the famous Turkish sword. This beauty has its price: the horns are still considered one of the most valuable trophies that can be obtained which puts the fragile creature's existence in terrible peril: many hunters dream of this decoration for their hunting collections and collectors are happy to pay any price. This is the reason why in the early twentieth century, the number of black antelopes began to decline sharply. To save the species, the authorities restricted hunting for it - especially for foreign tourists to whom were mandated expensive licenses, which were not so easy to get. But local residents could bypass this ban. In addition, the demand for antelope horns has only increased. Therefore, immediately there appeared enterprising businessmen who organized the sale of valuable trophies. And as you could see in the video at the top of the page, antelopes, as most grazers are meek and inquisitive. They approached the filmer carefully and gradually and in the end, they exposed themselves in such a way that any person could take advantage of. The adult male black antelope weighs about 280 kg. Its height at the withers is 117-140 cm with a body length of 190-210 cm. The females are not much smaller and slimmer: they weigh 240 kg with a body length of 130-150 cm. On both sides of the neck, there is a hard black mane, from 10 to 12 cm. The tip of the tail is decorated with a tassel. The color of the black antelope's coat depends on sex and age. Young males and adult females are usually of a dark chestnut color, but older males have charcoal-black fur. Only their belly is completely white. In addition, both sexes have a light pattern on their muzzles whisch is, like our fingerprints, unique for each individual. Black antelopes live in large herds. If there are enough water and pastures, then adult females with cubs adhere to the territory of one male. Leaders mark the boundaries of their lands with piles of manure and regularly update them. In addition, they leave visual marks as well: they use their sharp horns and heavy hooves to break and trample on a border-marking bush. Alpha-males actively protect their harem from uninvited visitors. During the fight, they kneel like horses and menacingly direct their magnificent antlers toward the enemy. Between females, too, a certain hierarchy is established. They can even fight with each other to prove their right to a higher position. At the same time, they are standing shoulder to shoulder by other females should their young be in danger. Very often, female Sable Antelopes are known to drive off even lioness, and during such fights, it does not matter whose cub was in trouble.

NataliaCara
Published: August 7, 2018318 plays$0.38 earned
Rescued cheetah has an attitude43s

Rescued cheetah has an attitude

This beautiful cheetah was rescued when he was still very little, and therefore, will have to spend the rest of his life at a wildlife sanctuary, where is now living the life! But that doesn't keep him from having an attitude while waiting to get fed, from time to time.

NataliaCara
Published: August 5, 201846 plays$0.08 earned
White tiger and lion get a meaty popsicle on a hot Summer day1m11s

White tiger and lion get a meaty popsicle on a hot Summer day

Animals that have to live in captivity need environmental enrichment: neural and physical stimulation in order to reduce stress and enhance their well-being. Big cats can't hunt when they live in an enclosure, so instead of always just being handed their food, they some times get a bucket of frozen meat and blood. It not only helps them endure hot Summer days, but it also keeps them entertained for a very long time!

NataliaCara
Published: August 1, 201824,661 plays$30.51 earned
Rescued baboon recovering from being abused as a baby58s

Rescued baboon recovering from being abused as a baby

This adorable young was given alcohol to drink, as a baby, before she was rescued. She's actually older than she looks, has neurological problems and is mostly blind, because of it, but now she lives at a wildlife sanctuary, where she is well cared for, and has the best life she could possibly have!

NataliaCara
Published: July 27, 201884 plays$0.13 earned
Making a rescued cheetah exercise before getting fed1m18s

Making a rescued cheetah exercise before getting fed

This cheetah had to be rescued and now lives in a pre-release area. He still needs to get fed, which means that he doesn't hunt, so he needs to chase the car in order to get his food. He knows that he will get fed regardless, so he doesn't exactly put on an effort... but at least he's getting some exercise!

Rescued sea turtles released back into the ocean1m12s

Rescued sea turtles released back into the ocean

These three young Green Sea Turtles were found at a beach and had to be rescued and rehabilitated. One is even missing a flipper, but with a lot of care from biologists and veterinarians, they were able to be returned to the ocean, where they belong. Awesome!

NataliaCara
Published: July 17, 2018845 plays$1.10 earned
Pack of rescued Wild Dogs share a meal1m01s

Pack of rescued Wild Dogs share a meal

African Wild Dogs live and hunt in packs, and the way they feed is very impressive! Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't like to get eaten by any animals, but when you see these guys eating, you can't help but be thankful that you are not their meal! Wild Dogs are highly social animals, and almost exclusively live in packs, usually of up to ten individuals, but packs with over 40 members have been recorded. A lone Wild Dog has a very slim chance of survival, and packs don’t accept new members. There is monogamous alpha mating pair in charge of the pack, but the pups are the ones who get to feed first, and the rest of the group has to patiently wait for their turn. The pack shares a very strong bond and when a member is injured or ill, and is unable to hunt, the other ones will care for it and feed it, making sure it doesn't die. Because the pack has such a coordinated nature, they have a 80% success rate with hunts, making them extremely effective predators! Because they communicate so well, they are even able to change strategy during a hunt. The African Wild Dog (Lycaon pictus), also known as African Painted Dog, is one of the most endangered mammals in the world! It was been considered endangered for over twenty years, and with an estimate of about 6,600 remaining in the wild. They are not only shot or poisoned by farmers, for being accused of killing livestock, but their main threat is habitat fragmentation, which not only subjects them to disease outbreaks, but increases the human-wild dog conflict. Their scientific name means "painted dog", due to their mottled coat, which has brown, yellow, white and black colors. And even though that is true for every Wild Dog, each of them will have a unique pattern, which makes them easy to be visually identified. Unlike other canids, they have no underfur, and it's entirely consisted of stiff bristle-hairs. The fur is gradually lost with age, making old individuals nearly bald.

Rescued baby baboons having fun39s

Rescued baby baboons having fun

These baby Chacma Baboons are all orphans, and had to be rescued, growing up at a wildlife sanctuary. They get taken on daily walks, where they have a lot of time to just play around, climb trees and have fun!

Adorable baby caracal resembles a Pokémon1m09s

Adorable baby caracal resembles a Pokémon

This adorable baby caracal unfortunately didn't have the chance to grow up in the wild, but it received the best care possible at a wildlife sanctuary in Africa. Caracals are extremely beautiful cats, with some very characteristic features, making the babies even cuter than other kittens, some times resembling a Pikachu. How not to fall in love with it?!

NataliaCara
Published: June 29, 2018143 plays$0.31 earned
Grey Seal Gets Photobombed By Harbor Porpoise29s

Grey Seal Gets Photobombed By Harbor Porpoise

In the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, you can see grey seals from the beach almost every day. But what you don't usually see is a dolphin in the background casually swimming along! What a lovely surprise! The silly seal seems oblivious to the presence of the porpoise, basking in the June sun, while the porpoise shows up just a few times while breaking on camera. Who knows, maybe the dolphin was equally as oblivious to the presence of the camera. The Gulf of Saint Lawrence is the outlet of the North American Great Lakes via the Saint Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. The gulf is a semi-enclosed sea, covering an area of about 87,000 square miles and containing about 8,300 cubic miles of water, which results in an average depth of 499 feet. Did you know that porpoises are also called “mereswine”? The reason behind it is actually pretty cool. “Porpoise” comes from the french “pourpois”, which in term comes from the Medieval Latin “porcopiscus”, a compound of “porcus”, meaning pig, and “piscus”, meaning fish. In Classical latin the are also called “ porculus marinus”, probably because of the fancied resemblance of the porpoise’s snout to that of a pig. The sound the make when breathing also resembles a pig snort. Porpoises keep close quarters near the polar regions, normally near the coast. One of the smallest marine mammals, the harbor porpoise stays close to coastal areas or river estuaries, and as such, is the most familiar porpoise to whale watchers. The harbour porpoise species is common in colder coastal waters of the North Atlantic, North Pacific and the Black Sea. The populations in these regions are not constant and are classified as separate subspecies. According to recent genetic evidence, the harbour porpoise population structure may be more complex, and they should be reclassified. In the Atlantic, harbour porpoises may be present in a curved band of water running from the coast of West Africa to the coasts of Spain, France, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Scandinavia, Iceland, Greenland, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and the eastern seaboard of the United States. The population in the Baltic Sea is limited in winter due to sea freezing, and is most common in the southwest parts of the sea. There is another band in the Pacific Ocean running from the Sea of Japan, Vladivostok, the Bering Strait, Alaska, British Columbia, and California. The harbor porpoise is not considered threatened, as their numbers reach hundreds of thousands. However, static fishing techniques such as gill and tangle nets, overfishing, marine and noise pollution, as well as climate change play a big factor in the conservation of this species. Bycatch in bottom-set gill nets is considered the main mortality factor caused by man for these porpoises. Numbers suggest that several thousand individuals die each year as incidental bycatch. Recently, porpoise-scaring devices, also known as pingers, have been developed to keep porpoises away from these nets. Studies have shown that they present as very effective in reducing entanglement. (source: Wikipedia)

NataliaCara
Published: June 18, 20184,626 plays$8.61 earned
Rescued cheetahs being protective over ostrich carcass54s

Rescued cheetahs being protective over ostrich carcass

A wild ostrich was found dead on a fence, and fed to the four rescued cheetahs. The cat had a feast, to the point where they could barely move and wouldn't even stop panting, but even then they were still very protective over their ostrich carcass.

Goofy hedgehog sleeps in totally ridiculous position25s

Goofy hedgehog sleeps in totally ridiculous position

Every once in a while we catch ourselves in a weird position that sometimes isn't even comfortable, but we can't be bothered to move. Well, that's what happened with this adorable hedgehog. It is perfectly fine, in spite of not looking like it; it just couldn't be bothered to move. Animals are so funny!

NataliaCara
Published: June 11, 201816,133 plays$21.34 earned
Rescued baboons go for a walk40s

Rescued baboons go for a walk

These teenage Chacma Baboons are all orphans, and were rescued at a very early age. Growing up at a wildlife sanctuary, they get taken on daily walks, to exercise, and they love running around!