BarcroftAnimals

Makeovers For New York’s Stray Dogs5m41s

Makeovers For New York’s Stray Dogs

A GENEROUS animal lover is helping find homes for New York’s stray dogs - by giving them a free bath and haircut. In 2016, almost 9000 homeless dogs were taken in by the Animal Care Centers of NYC. Over half of these were strays found on the streets, with no owners to care for them, feed or groom them. So, armed with his scissors and electric clippers, volunteer dog groomer Mark Imhof has been visiting the centres for two years to help the homeless animals desperately in need of a haircut. And kind-hearted Mark has now groomed over 500 dogs, helping countless pups find new fur-ever homes.

Gator Girl Belays Social Life To Rescue Nuisance Alligators5m27s

Gator Girl Belays Social Life To Rescue Nuisance Alligators

While her peers are out socializing with other folk their age, Gabby Scampone is wrestling alligators. She moved from New York to Florida few months ago to pursue a career in relocating and caring for alligators. Gabby says she’s been loving reptiles since she was 15, so with the lack of alligators in New York, she decided to seek her happiness elsewhere. “When I moved here and told my parents that I was wrestling alligators they weren’t too excited. They were obviously afraid for me because it can be dangerous. But they support me in everything I do." says the brave 22-year-old. With her boss Paul Bedard she volunteers at Everglades Holiday Park, where she puts on a daily show wrestling alligators whilst also educating the audience. She might be following the career path she always wanted, but it doesn’t come without some difficulties. Mainly, it is Gabby’s social life that has taken a toll. "So I was actually on a date last week. Half way through the date, Paul calls me about an alligator. So obviously I have to go get it, but it was a blessing in disguise because the guy didn’t want to come with me. Gabby says she will continue pursuing her dream career with alligators, hoping to not lose any fingers in the process.

The 'Birdman' Of Gujarat Feeds Thousands Of Birds Every Day3m28s

The 'Birdman' Of Gujarat Feeds Thousands Of Birds Every Day

Harsukhbhai Dobariya and his family have been feeding thousands of birds every single day for the past 17 years. Parrots, weaver birds, pigeons and crows are some of the species which flock in every morning to the rooftop of Harsukhbhai’s home in Gujarat, India. This generous family spends over £1100 every three months to feed these birds on sticks of pearl millets. “The fact that these birds come is what pleases me the most. The more birds come the more I enjoy”, says Harsukhbhai. These people wake up early in the morning and get busy preparing food for their early morning guests, who start arriving in flocks with the first rays of the sun. This has been their tradition, and they’ve been doing it for 17 years. To feed this large number of birds, he made a special contraption which makes it easier for him to hang out the sticks of pearl millets. Harsukhbhai is a farmer by profession and also runs a showroom. Along with juggling work in the fields and the showroom, he also makes small bird shelters which he decorates with beads and glitters to sell to people. These birds come from as far as 50 kilometres away, however none of them are caged and they fly back to their nests and the tree tops once they are done with the feeding. The birds bring their chicks along and the number keeps increasing over the years. Friends come over for tea and watch the spectacular flocking in the mornings. And the entire household of Harsukhbhai is equal in their love and compassion for these winged creatures. Videographer / director: Shams Qari Producer: Haziq Qadri, Ruby Coote Editor: Marcus Cooper

Check Out What The Inside Of New York's Luxury Dog Hotel Looks Like4m38s

Check Out What The Inside Of New York's Luxury Dog Hotel Looks Like

Private chef-prepared meals, spa treatments and chauffeur-driven rides are just a few of the services provided to clients of New York’s most exclusive hotel… for dogs. D Pet Hotels, in New York’s affluent Chelsea neighborhood, caters for the pets of the rich and famous, and its rooms and services are fit for the world’s most pampered pups. And with basic suites starting at a cool $84 a night and featuring an orthopedic bed, TV, and 24-hour care, patrons include some of the world’s most famous dog lovers. The hotel’s co-owner Kerry Brown says their clientele varies from attorneys and bankers, to pop star princesses and movie actors. When nothing but the best will do for their furbabies, the hotel’s clients will book an “uber suite”, complete with a double bed and a 42 inch TV screen that plays all the doggie-friendly programs, for a mere $200 a night. Anything to make their dogs feel as much at home as possible. She adds: “[The uber suites] are nicer than my bedroom at home.” They even offer a specialized gym for the fitness-conscious pups, since sometimes it is imperative that these dogs keep up their normal routine. This also means having their walk at a specific time of day or night. Kerry said a lot of New Yorkers have chosen not to have children and their dog is their child. “Parents know when they bring their dog here that they can expect the very best, and that we are going to treat them just like family.” Videographer / director: Adam Gray Producer: Sophia Rahman, Ruby Coote Editor: Sonia Estal

Fefe The Plucking Cute Cockatoo | CUTE AS FLUFF1m38s

Fefe The Plucking Cute Cockatoo | CUTE AS FLUFF

She might be a little on the bald side, but Fefe is like any other happy Goffin cockatoo. Her previous owner had kept her in bad conditions, with a lack of stimulation and poor nutrition. Sadly this lead to the little cockatoo plucking out her feathers due to stress. Fortunately the 16-year-old parrot was adopted by nurse, Eve Butler, one and a half years ago, in Miami, Florida. "She was relinquished to Parrot Outreach Society by a woman who had to care for her sick mother and could no longer care for Fefe. It was my understanding when the women prior to me got her she was three years old and was already plucking her feathers.” said Fefe’s new owner. "I am a volunteer at Parrot Outreach and fell in love with her as soon as she came in. The funny thing is she has fallen in love with my husband. Every waking moment she wants to be with him!” Fefe’s hair follicles are so damaged from her previous stress, that the feathers will never grow back on her head and back. In an attempt to prevent the bird from plucking herself further, Eve tried putting clothes on her, like flower petal collars or sock sweaters. But Fefe was smart, so she would figure out how to get them off. "The petal collars stayed on a little longer but you could tell how miserable she was. My husband and I finally decided to quit putting her through misery just to try to get her feathers to grow back. We love her just the way she is.” According to the organisation In Defense of Animals, the companion parrot has 'joined the ranks alongside the most discarded, homeless pets in America'. They further reported that 'parrots are surrendered or sold and live in at least five homes before dying prematurely or finding their forever home'. Videographer / director: Eve Butler Producer: Shannon Lane, James Thorne Editor: James Thorne

Big Cats Are ‘Beast Buddies’ Of This Petite Woman 4m02s

Big Cats Are ‘Beast Buddies’ Of This Petite Woman

This tiny animal lover does not let her size stop her from interacting with deadly lions that weigh more than 480lbs. In the heart of the Limpopo Province, South Africa, 35-year-old Annel Snyman spends her days cuddling and hand-feeding the most dangerous of predators, by forming a close bond with lions, leopards, cheetahs and hyenas. Annel is the owner of Loebies Guesthouse and Predator Park, which houses 35 animals, 17 of which are wild predators and scavengers that Annel has hand-raised. Annel Snyman established the park in 2009, and says that it requires a lot of hard work, but thanks to the dedicated staff she employed, things run smoothly. There are many people and school groups who visit the park and they try to educate people about the wild cats. Many guests would ask her if she trusts her lions to which she replies that she is not scared but only cautious. Neil Van Deventer is her main park assistant. They always work in pairs of two for just in case, because every animal can bite and attack, as they cannot be completely trusted. She says that all animals have a different way of talking to her and have different personalities. Her house is in the middle of the park, which they call the zoo house, and there are several animals living with her. They sit on the sofa, they get into her clothes. She has a few scars and stories to tell. Some animals might think you are part of the pride and never show aggression but only want to play. They give you cuddles, they jump on you, which is their own way of showering you with affection. She says she does it for the love she receives, they are simply “beast buddies”. Videographer / director: Paul Hugo, Jannes De Villiers Producer: Danny Baggott, James Thorne Editor: James Thorne